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Wiccans: Do you have a step-by-step booklist that will get someone from beginner to a intermediate levels?

I.E. to get them from knowing next to nothing about Wicca, to understanding the various concepts that are used in Wiccan circles. (From Animal Magick, to Qabalah, to Herbal Magick, to Ritual, to Religious Texts… etc)
I do, I just want to see what other books people use.
Excellent booklist slice.
I didn’t say there’d be one specific booklist, but there should be a few curriculums that will get people a knowledge of most of the topics they’re supposed to know.
That’s ok labgirl, I respect your oath.
Ok. I’m going to attempt my own list here…..
Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner, Cunningham… Buckland’s Complete Book of Spirit Communication… Animal Speak, Andrews… The Chicken Qabalah, Duquette… Modern Magic, Kraig… Prometheus Rising, Wilson… The Witches’ God, The Witches’ Goddess, Farrars… Progressive Witchcraft, Farrar & Bone… Cunningham’s Encyclopaedia of Magickal Herbs… Visual Magick, Fries.

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Miles BattyTrickyTinkTriciaWiccan Hellenic PolytheistHCElderconfused_390 Recent comment authors
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Miles Batty
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Miles Batty

I can recommend one….. “Teaching WitchCraft: A Guide for Teachers and Students of the Old Religion” by Miles Batty This book is designed like a classroom textbook. It’s a lesson-by-lesson syllabus for teaching the essentials of WitchCraft, organized in two parts. Part One covers the history, philosophy and ethics of the Craft, and Part Two examines the inner workings of a Coven, the theory and practice of ritual, spellcrafting and magickal components. Each lesson include study questions and some have interactive classroom modules, and there are a midterm and a final exam. The study questions are designed to help the… Read more »

TrickyTinkTricia
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TrickyTinkTricia

No I don’t.
I own many books and have owned many books that I have passed onto to others as I have not needed them anymore.
There are many fantastic books and I have mentioned some of them before. It ain’t all in the books though.
It is so much more therapeutic to hunt them out yourself and learn what you know is right from them.
It wouldn’t feel right to give you a list of books to read.
Practice makes learning and reading is study.

BB

Wiccan Hellenic Polytheist
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Wiccan Hellenic Polytheist

No

HCElder
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HCElder

Short answer – No. Books can be an invaluable source of information. Books provide details about history, capture experiences, and provide tools for development and self discovery. Books are not the end all, be all in knowledge. Especially in Wicca. I can not provide a generic list that will take someone from point A to point B for several reasons. First, to be Wiccan is to be an initiate. I don’t necessarily mean an initiated member of a Tradition, I mean that you are fully and wholly experiencing your religion. At some point you have to put the books down… Read more »

confused_390
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confused_390

Gad! You mean there’s supposed to be a _structure_ somewhere after the beginning/introductory level? News to me! If there was one…somebody forgot to put me on the “distribution list”. :-))

I was under the impression that most “wing it” with an ongoing investigation of other systems methodology and techniques…then “graft” same onto what they were doing.

Raji the Green Witch
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Raji the Green Witch

I do, sort of. I make them read the works of Witchy writers in order of them being written, beginning with Leland all the way up to and including (retching) Silver RavenWolf. Yes, I include SRW in my reading list because I want them to be able to see for themselves that there IS fundamentalism in Witchcraft just as in the other Religions. I want MY students to be able to seperate the valid from that which is not. Furthermore, I insist on my students discussing their reading with me before they go on to the next book. Asking questions,… Read more »

tawniemarie
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tawniemarie

Slice39’s list is very good.
I also think that once you become Wiccan, your talents and interests will develop on their own. You may find that you love herbology and crystals, that you prefer tarot over scrying, etc. Then you will want to read books about those subjects. Also you might be fascinated by Egyptians or the Celts, and wish to study more about them. All of these will help you on your path.

twoasonesfl
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twoasonesfl

As Garnerians, we would, naturally, have “Witchcraft today”, a long dry read, to be sure. We also have the “Encyclopedia of Witches and Witchcraft” as well as the “Encyclopedia of Wicca and Witchcraft”. Just about everyone that we know has Buckland’s big blue book on Witchcraft and many of us also have the elemental series of books by Jaq D. Hawkins along with “Animal Speak” and “Animal Wise” by Ted Andrews. Scott Cunningham is a very good and respected author for the solitary Practitioner and for eclectics, but misses a lot of the things that traditional paths will gain through… Read more »

LabGrrl SuperTech
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LabGrrl SuperTech

Yes, however, it’s the equivalent of oathbound.

It’s not for those outside my group, in otherwords.

Sorry. If you’d like a specific suggestion on a specific topic, I’m willing to help.

slice39
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slice39

Recommended Reading:

http://www.paganhouse.ws/owlbooks.shtml

This list comes from our year and a day class.

orestes_otm
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orestes_otm

Learning paganism isn’t like taking a course & passing a test. It’s a path to follow. Most pagans I know are eclectic & pick & choose what works for them.

The You seem to be comparison it to a type of of belief where you have specific texts to follow to join their club.

PS don’t you just hate people who cut & paste answerers.

crypt0mnesia
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crypt0mnesia

This site is great for basic stuff http://www.sacred-texts.com/
It covers:

African
Age of Reason
Alchemy
Americana
Ancient Near East
Asia
Atlantis
Australia
Basque
Baha’i
Bible
Book of Shadows
Buddhism
Celtic
Christianity
Classics
Confucianism
DNA
Earth Mysteries
Egyptian
England
Esoteric/Occult
Chaos Magic
Enochian Magic
Rosicrucians
Evil
Fortean
Freemasonry
Gothic
Gnosticism
Grimoires
Hinduism
I Ching
Islam
Icelandic
Jainism
Journals
Judaism
Legends/Sagas
LGBT
Miscellaneous
Mormonism
Native American
Necronomicon
New Thought
Neopaganism/Wicca
Nostradamus
Oahspe
Pacific
Paleolithic
Philosophy
Piri Re’is Map
Prophecy
Roma
Sacred Books of the East
Sacred Sexuality
Shakespeare
Shamanism
Shinto
Sikhism
Sub Rosa
Swedenborg
Sky Lore
Tantra
Taoism
Tarot
Thelema
Theosophy
Time
Tolkien
UFOs
Utopia
Women
Zoroastrianism

Lion of Judah
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Lion of Judah

Wicca is an eclectic religious belief system centering around gods, goddesses, and nature worship. Gary Cantrell, a well known Wiccan author says Wicca is based on “harmony with nature and all aspects of the god and goddess divinity.”1 Wiccan practice involves the manipulation of nature through various rituals in attempts to gain power, prestige, love, or whatever else a Wiccan wants. It uses symbols in its ceremonies and follows the calendar in reference to Wiccan festivals. Its roots are in ancient agrarian Celtic Society. It is considered Neo Pagan (based on old European and pre-Christian belief systems). Wicca does not… Read more »

Pangel ((((((HUGS))))))
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Pangel ((((((HUGS))))))

I bought my daughter the Wicca Bible
she just wanted to know the basics of Wicca … and this seems to explain everything very well

http://store.higherheart.com/product.php/1670/0/42ff3a135ea389d3019edbf365577670

Maria Isabel
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Maria Isabel

I’m not Wiccan, but one of the best books for beginners is “Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner” by Scott Cunningham.

PrairieDog
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PrairieDog

no