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  • it comes with practice, at first you are going to over think it. after some more practice it will come more easily. Just keep at it.

  • You aren’t trying to focus on not thinking about anything. You are only paying attention. First you need something to concentrate on such as the breath or the rise and fall of your abdomen. Just watch its rise and fall and just pay attention, that’s it. If you get distracted by a thought, it’s ok no need to beat yourself up. Just mentally note it and go back to your object of focus. If your mind wanders, your mind wanders. Just catch yourself every time, if you wander off into your thoughts it’s ok it happens. When there’s a feeling that arises just mentally note what it is (such as anger, fear, etc.) and then go back to your object of focus. Also if you are just starting off, don’t worry about sitting a long time or anything like that. How much ever you can handle is good, just try to keep doing it without giving up after a few days. If you have a strong resistance against meditating, then you can observe that.

  • Use a short mantra and control your breathing.
    “Gonna have a great day” is a good one, say it at a comfortable speed and get a rhythm with your breath going with it at a comfortable speed then just drift off, go on auto pilot. Like driving a car and wondering if you passed any stop signs or reading a book but having to start over because you caught yourself day dreaming instead. Well that little annoying habit actually has a use, it’s perfect for meditation.
    In meditation the less you try the more you achieve. The mantra keeps you focused along with your breathing and off to the astral plane you go.

  • Focus on your breathing while you meditate. Don’t change it or anything, just pay attention to it. Only meditate for about 5 minutes at first. If you find your mind wandering away then just bring it gently back to the breath. Soon you will be able to spend the 5 minutes paying attention to your breath, and then you can increase the amount of time, and after that you can meditate on any one thing, or no thing. It is like exercise, you must build up your tolerance for it. Monks and masters practice for decades before they are able to do it for hours.

  • Instead of trying not to think of anything, try thinking of nothing.

    This is partly why Zen practitioners focus on the breath. It gives them a neutral point on which to keep the mind.

    Or you could the vipassana route and let your mind wander, but make efforts to remain aware of all you are thinking and feeling and just let the flow decide where it will go until you no longer identify with the flow.

    There are literally thousands of meditation techniques used by different Buddhist traditions. Don’t be afraid to experiment.

    And also, it’s supposed to be a little hard, but not too much. Right effort.

  • Meditation is being able to concentrate on one thing not nothing. You meditate when you day dream and when you sleep.

  • Best way to focus, for me at least, is to focus on breathing. Think of nothing but your breath going in and out. The more you practice, the easier it becomes (although when you are tired or agitated, it is never easy).

  • You’re trying too hard.

    Don’t be so goal oriented. When your mind wanders, just observe it, label it “thinking”, and let it go. Return to center, and start again.

    This works for me. Also, I focus on the space between the in breath and the out breath. It’s not common (most people I know focus on the out breath), but once again, it works for me.

  • They say to start out counting your breaths. Count 1 for breathing in, and another when exhaling. Start over at 1 once you reach 10.

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