Discussion Forum

why do christians deny the holy spirit?

The closing decades of the 20th century and the first years of the 21st century have been times of significant flux. Technology, society, family, and religion, have shifted in incredible ways. Part of the change in religion during the past 25 years has been an upsurge of worship of feminine deities – goddesses. Whereas part of this trend was unquestionably fostered by feminism, other aspects of seeking the Divine Feminine were totally unrelated.
Recently, women and men have felt an increasing affinity for Goddess – a sense of being drawn. Yet, the Bible seemed to be mute on the matter. Most clergy [who were products of culture and theological seminaries, and were protective of denominational dogma and their own salaries] had no meaningful insight or guidance to offer in this area. The majority of those who became devotees of the Divine Feminine felt compelled to exit Judaism or Christianity in order to do so. The search for Goddess led many to the pantheon of gods and goddesses found in Wicca, or related Neo-pagan religions.
What surprises [or even shocks] many is that the Goddess has been ever-present within the pages of the Bible. The Goddess to whom a growing number of individuals feel drawn is included in the Hebrew Scriptures. Her presence is one of the many mysteries of the ancient Israelite texts. Intentionally, translators, denominational councils and quorums obscured many scriptural truths. The Goddess has been made nearly invisible in English translations. Centuries of androcentric cultural bias have contributed to Her concealment. The intent of the following comments is to reveal the mystery of the Divine Feminine – the Goddess within the Scriptures.

Concealed, But in Plain View

For a combination of reasons, scholars and theologians have masked profound truths about Elohim, the God of Israel. The existence the Divine Feminine has been deliberately obscured by mainstream religion for a multitude of centuries. [The same can be said of the sacred names and certain attributes of the Divine, as well as many other plain and precious spiritual teachings.] Knowledge that is most important has been buried for many, many centuries. Included among the many pearls of truth which have been concealed from nearly all churches and synagogues is the awareness that Elohim has both male and female attributes and aspects.
The androgynous nature of Elohim is quite evident in the account of the creation of mankind found in the first chapter of Genesis. “And God [Elohim] said, Let us make man [adam = mankind] in our own image, after our likeness?So God [Elohim] created man in the image of God [Elohim]?male and female created he them?and called their name Adam.” [Genesis 1:27, 5:2] As Elohim is both male and female, mankind was also created male and female.
In the original Hebrew of the Bible there is one word, Eloah, which literally means “Goddess”. Eloah is the feminine form of God. Other words describing God are also distinctly female. Hebrew nouns are usually gender-specific [although some can be gender-neutral in usage]. While some of the Hebrew words for God have a distinctly feminine gender, translators have almost universally chosen to suppress this, being unwilling to use the feminine word “Goddess”. Likewise, they have consistently used masculine pronouns when referring to God, even when gender-neutral or feminine pronouns would have been more appropriate. Most present-day Bible dictionaries, commentaries, and concordances are still biased, and ignore basic Hebrew grammatical rules when it comes to translating the words designating Deity. This has resulted in most Christians and Jews holding to the view that God is exclusively male. To most Christians and Jews, awareness of the Divine Feminine is not only unfamiliar, but, initially, seems unbelievable.

Elohim

Elohim is the Hebrew word that is most commonly translated as the English “God.” Elohim is gender-combined, plural word. The word Elohim is concurrently male and female, and simultaneouslyrepresents both unity and majestic plurality. Elohim is a compound of the feminine singular Eloah with the masculine plural suffix -im. The word Elohim represents a majestic, awesome God that is beyond the ability of the human mind to fully comprehend. We can comprehend some of the attributes of Elohim, but the fullness of the Godhead is beyond our understanding.
El is the masculine singular Hebrew word for God. Although male, in practice, El is often gender-neutral. Eloah is the feminine singular form of the same word, and can be correctly translated ‘Goddess’. In Hebrew, the -oah, -oh or -ah suffix makes a word feminine. This is very similar to the English suffix -ess, used in such words as waitress, stewardess, or poetess. Eloah is female.
Elohim is a combination of the singular feminine word Eloah, to which the masculine plural suffix -im has been added. In Hebrew, the -im is normally added only used to make masculine words plural. The question that naturally arises is, Why add a masculine suffix to a feminine root? The answer is that Elohim is androgynous, being simultaneously male and female in principle and attributes.

Eloah / El Shaddai

El Shaddai or simply Shaddai are other titles of God. As has already been mentioned, El means ‘God’. The word shad means “woman’s breast” [7699], and shaddai [Strong’s 7706] means “breasts”, “breasted”, or “many breasts”. Though El Shaddai is translated as “Almighty God”, “God Almighty”, or “the Almighty” in the English Bible, it literally means “God with breasts” or “[many] breasted [One]” There are those who refuse to translate Shaddai as “breasts”, however, the parallelism of the language used in Jacob’s blessing, in Genesis 49:25, emphasizes that this is the correct translation. The descriptive title El Shaddai describes the Goddess of Israel.
There is a fascinatingly important declaration in Exodus 6:3: “I appeared to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob by the name of El Shaddai, but by my name Yahweh I was not known to [perceived by] them.” While there is confirmation that the Patriarchs were aware of the name Yahweh, evidently Elohim related to the Patriarchs primarily as the feminine Eloah and El Shaddai. This revelation to Moses is highly important to our understanding.
Eloah appears 57 times in the Old Testament; two-thirds of those mentions occur in the book of Job. Shaddai or El Shaddai appears in the Tanakh [Old Testament] 48 times. It is found in the book of Job 31 of those occurrences. The fact that Job lived during the days of the Patriarchs, combined with Yahweh’s declaration to Moses about the Patriarchs mainly recognizing Deity as El Shaddai, allows us to conclude that the Goddess attributes of Elohim were much more clearly understood in Patriarchal times. Although the names Elohim and Yahweh appear many more times than Eloah or El Shaddai in the Bible, we must notice significance in the fact that the ancients had a considerable understanding of and relationship with the Divine Feminine.
In Job there are two specific declarations of the femininity of Eloah. Yahweh announced to Job, “the sea?leapt tumultuous from the womb.” [Job 38:8] Then, Yahweh rhetorically asked, “Out of whose womb came the ice?” [Job 38:29] Obviously, these verses [and others that will be mentioned later] undeniably attribute feminine characteristics to Eloah.
Eloah is synonymous with Shaddai, the Feminine God. “Can you claim to fathom the depth of [Eloah]? Can you reach the limit of [Shaddai]?” [Job 11:7] “Then Shaddai will be your delight, and you will lift your face to [Eloah].” [Job 22:26] “Can he be happy with [Shaddai]? Can he call on [Eloah] at all times?” [Job 27:10] A similar verse is, “Now what portion does [Eloah] allot from above; what fate does Shaddai apportion from [Her] heaven?” [Job 31:2]
Several verses, mostly within the book of Job, mention either El or Yahweh as distinct from Eloah. “Is Yahweh’s opponent going to give way? Has [Eloah’s] critic thought up an answer?” [Job 40:2] “I would seek unto [El], and unto [Eloah] I would commit my case.” [Job 5:8] “Does [El] pervert judgment, or does [Shaddai] pervert justice?if you search for [El] and plead for mercy from [Shaddai]?” [Job 8:3,5] “This is the portion of a wicked man from [El], and the heritage appointed him by [Eloah].” [Job 20:29] “I swear by the living [El] who denies me justice, and by Shaddai who has filled me with bitterness.” [Job 27:2] “[El] judges the Righteous and Eloah is angered by the Wicked every day.” [Psalm 7:11] Similar passages include Job 15:25, 22:17, 23:16, 33:4, 34:12, and 35:13.

The Holy Spirit

The Hebrew Ruach ha Kodesh is the phrase that translates into the Holy Spirit. Ruach is feminine, and the Aramaic equivalent ruah is also a feminine noun. These words are paired with feminine verbs and pronouns. The Holy Spirit is feminine, and is another designation of Eloah. Therefore, in the original texts, Messiah promised: “And I will pray the Father, and He shall give you another Comforter, that she may dwell with you forever.” [John 14:16]
The Holy Spirit is portrayed in the role of Comforter in John chapters 14 to 16. This role of comforting is associated with mothering. “As a mother comforts a child, so shall I comfort you.” [Isaiah 66:13] In Isaiah 11:2, the “spirit of Wisdom” is also called the “spirit of Yahweh”.
The other Hebrew word commonly used to refer to the Holy Spirit is ‘shekinah’. The feminine word shekinah appears in Aramaic translations of the Bible, and is commonly use within modern Judaism. Shekinah is the equivalent of the Holy Spirit; it means “Divine Presence”.
Several first or second-century Christian documents discovered at Nag Hammadi plainly identify the Holy Spirit as feminine – as the mother figure within the Godhead. In the Apocryphon of John, Elohim appeared to John and said, “I am the Father, I am the Mother, I am the Son. I am the undefiled and uncorruptible One.” In the Gospel According to the Hebrews, the phrase “my mother the Holy Spirit” appears. The Pistis Sophia and other early writings indicate that within the early church there was awareness that the Holy Spirit is female.

God Became

In certain Hebrew traditions God is referred to as Ain Sof – which means “without end”. God is infinite, ultimate, and immeasurable – beyond our capability to fully understand. That being admitted, it is within our ability to discover a wealth of knowledge about the Divine within the Scriptures, particularly by uniting passages from the various component books.
The scriptures are emphatic that there is one God – one Elohim. The Shema declares: “Listen, O Israel, Yahweh your Elohim is One.” [Deuteronomy 6:4] Though there is unmistakable unity in God, the scriptures simultaneously reveal a plurality. “The Father, and?the Son, and?the Holy Ghost ?are one God. [Mormon 7:7 (3:29); Alma 11:44 (8:102-104)] The Spirit Eloah is part of the Divine – just as the Father and Son are distinct elements within the majestic plurality that is Elohim.
The words Elohim and Yahweh may each be classified as collective nouns. Collective nouns include words such as family, flock, herd, forest, jury, staff and team. The plurality of Elohim [or of Yahweh] can be understood in the collective sense of family. Paul wrote that “the whole family in Heaven” receives its name from Elohim. [Ephesians 3:15]
The ancient American prophet, Abinadi revealed the astonishing truth that God [Elohim] became the Father and the Son. [Mosiah 15:3 (8:30)] This is an essential point in our understanding. Abinadi stated that Elohim became the various roles and persons of God. This is likened to the Apostle’s inspired statement that “the Word became flesh. [John 1:14] Elohim became the Father and the Spirit and the Son.
The fact that there is a Father implies the presence of family. God became the Father in relationship to the Son, the Spirit and the whole Divine Family. The presence of family necessitates gender. Similarly, the fact that Messiah is the Bridegroom necessitates that there must be a Bride. Not only did Elohim become the masculine Father and the masculine Messiah, Elohim also became the feminine Holy Spirit / Eloah / Wisdom and the Bride [the Elect]. There is a perfect male-female balance within the Divine.
When a person believes in the Father, the Holy Spirit or the Son, because of their unity, that person believes in the other aspects of Elohim as well. Messiah said, “Whoso believeth in Me believeth in the Father also; and unto him will the Father bear record of Me, and the Holy Ghost will bear record unto him of the Father and Me; for the Father and I and the Holy Ghost are one.” [3rd Nephi 11:35-36 (5:36-38)]

Wisdom

Wisdom is another designation for the Goddess Eloah. ‘Wisdom’ is the feminine Hebrew word Hochmah. [Strong’s 2451, 2452 and 2454] The equivalent name in Greek is Sophia. [4678] Although the word ‘wisdom’ definitely is equated with good judgment and astuteness, in several scripture passages, Wisdom is unmistakably a Divine Personage. Wisdom is feminine, and distinctly referred to by feminine pronouns. The Messiah said: “Wisdom is proven by Her children.” [Luke 7:35] In a number of passages of scripture, Wisdom is described and adored by writers, and also speaks on her own behalf. This is particularly true of the 8th chapter of Proverbs, the 24th chapter of Ecclesiasticus, and the 7th chapter of the Wisdom of Solomon.
Wisdom announces that She was brought forth before the creation. She also assisted in the creative process, alongside Yahweh. “Yahweh created Me, first-fruits of His fashioning, before the oldest of His works. From everlasting I was firmly set – from the beginning, before the earth came into being/ The deep was not when I was born, nor were the springs with their abounding waters. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills, I came to birth; before He had made the earth, the countryside, and the first elements of the world. When he fixed the heavens firm, I was there; when He drew a circle on the surfaces of the deep, when He thickened the clouds above, when the sources of the deep began to swell, when He assigned the sea its boundaries (and the waters will not encroach on the shore), when He traced the foundations of the earth. I was beside the Master Craftsman, delighting Him day after day, ever at play in His presence, to play everywhere on His earth, delighting to be with the children of men. [Proverbs 8:22-31]
Within the apocryphal books of Ecclesiasticus [also known as Ben Sirach], and the Wisdom of Solomon [sometimes known simply as Wisdom], the Feminine Deity is quite evident. It is apparent that the following passages are greater than mere personifications of the attribute of wisdom, but represent statements by and about Eloah. {The surviving originals of these manuscripts exist only in Greek; however, based upon translation in the Septuagint, we can extrapolate the original Hebrew equivalent of certain words.}record of Me, for He will visit him with fire and with the Holy Ghost. And thus will the Father bear record of Me, and the Holy Ghost will bear record unto him of the Father and Me; for the Father and I and the Holy Ghost are one.” [3rd Nephi 11:35-36 (5:36-38)]

Wisdom

Wisdom is another designation for the Goddess Eloah. ‘Wisdom’ is the feminine Hebrew word Hochmah. [Strong’s 2451, 2452 and 2454] The equivalent name in Greek is Sophia. [4678] Although the word ‘wisdom’ definitely is equated with good judgment and astuteness, in several scripture passages, Wisdom is unmistakably a Divine Personage. Wisdom is feminine, and distinctly referred to by feminine pronouns. The Messiah said: “Wisdom is proven by Her children.” [Luke 7:35] In a number of passages of scripture, Wisdom is described and adored by writers, and also speaks on her own behalf. This is particularly true of the 8th chapter of Proverbs, the 24th chapter of Ecclesiasticus, and the 7th chapter of the Wisdom of Solomon.
Wisdom announces that She was brought forth before the creation. She also assisted in the creative process, alongside Yahweh. “Yahweh created Me, first-fruits of His fashioning, before the oldest of His works. From everlasting I was firmly set – from the beginning, before the earth came into being/ The deep was not when I was born, nor were the springs with their abounding waters. Before the mountains were settled, before the hills, I came to birth; before He had made the earth, the countryside, and the first elements of the world. When he fixed the heavens firm, I was there; when He drew a circle on the surfaces of the deep, when He thickened the clouds above, when the sources of the deep began to swell, when He assigned the sea its boundaries (and the waters will not encroach on the shore), when He traced the foundations of the earth. I was beside the Master Craftsman, delighting Him day after day, ever at play in His presence, to play everywhere on His earth, delighting to be with the children of men. [Proverbs 8:22-31]
Within the apocryphal books of Ecclesiasticus [also known as Ben Sirach], and the Wisdom of Solomon [sometimes known simply as Wisdom], the Feminine Deity is quite evident. It is apparent that the following passages are greater than mere personifications of the attribute of wisdom, but represent statements by and about Eloah. {The surviving originals of these manuscripts exist only in Greek; however, based upon translation in the Septuagint, we can extrapolate the original Hebrew equivalent of certain words.}
“Wisdom [Sophia] speaks Her own praises in the midst of Her people She glories in Herself. She opens Her mouth in the assembly of the Most High {El Elyon}; She glories Herself in the presence of the Mighty One {Abi’ir}: I came forth from the mouth of the Most High, and I covered the earth like mist. I had My tabernacle in the heights, and My throne was a pillar of cloud. Alone I have made the circuit of the heavens, and walked through the depths of the abyss. Over the waves of the sea and over the whole earth, and over every people and nation I have held sway. Among all these I searched for rest, and looked to see in whose territory I might pitch camp. Then the Creator of all things instructed Me, and He who created Me fixed a place for My tent. He said, ‘Pitch your tent in Jacob; make Israel Your inheritance.’ From eternity, in the beginning, He created Me, and for eternity I shall remain. In the holy tabernacle I ministered before Him, and thus became established in Zion. [Ecclesiasticus 24:1-10]
“And so I prayed?I entreated, and the spirit of Wisdom came to me. I esteemed Her more than scepters and thrones; compared with Her, I held riches as nothing. I reckoned no precious stone to be Her equal, for compared with Her all gold is a pinch of sand, and beside Her silver ranks as mud. I loved Her more than health or beauty, preferred Her to the light since Her radiance never sleeps. In Her company all good things came to me, and at Her hands incalculable wealth. All these delighted me, since Wisdom brings them, though I did not then realize that She was their Mother?” [Wisdom of Solomon 7:7-12]
“And now I understand everything, hidden or visible, for Wisdom, the designer of all things, has instructed me. For within Her is a spirit intelligent, holy, unique, manifold, subtle, mobile, incisive, unsullied, lucid, invulnerable, benevolent, shrewd, irresistible, beneficent, friendly to human beings, steadfast, dependable, unperturbed, almighty, all-surveying, penetrating, all-intelligent, pure and most subtle spirits. For Wisdom is quicker to move than any motion; She is so pure, She pervades and permeates all things. She is a breath {ruach} of the power of God {Elohim}, pure emanation of the glory of the Almighty {Shaddai}; so nothing impure can find its way into Her. For she is a reflection of the eternal light, untarnished mirror of God’s active power, and image of His goodness.” [Wisdom of Solomon 7:21-26]
“Although She is alone [only one power, but] She can do everything. Herself unchanging, She renews the world, and, generation after generation, passing into holy souls, she makes them into God’s friends and prophets; for God loves only those who dwell with Wisdom. She is indeed more splendid than the sun; She outshines all the constellations. Compared with light, she takes first place; for light must yield to night, but against Wisdom, evil cannot prevail. Strongly She reaches from one end of the world to the other and She governs the whole world for its good.” [Wisdom of Solomon 7:27-30]
Solomon prayed to Yahweh regarding Wisdom. “With You is Wisdom; She Who knows your works, She Who was present when You made the world. She understands what is pleasing in Your eyes,and what agrees with Your commandments. Dispatch Her from the holy heavens, send Her forth from Your throne of glory to help me and toil with me, and teach me what is pleasing to You. Because She knows and understands everything, She will guide me prudently in my actions, and will protect me with Her glory.” [Wisdom 9:9-11]

Not the Goddesses of the Gentiles

The apostle Paul wrote that people give honor to many different gods and goddesses. [1 Corinthians 8:5-6] We acknowledge the same today – adherents to a variety of religions worship many gods and goddesses. Although people worship “many gods and many lords”, there is only one true God – Elohim. Those whom the scriptures call Gentiles generally worshipped other gods or goddesses. This means that they worship gods or goddesses that have been invented within their own imagination, or are misinterpretations of the truth of Eloah. Instead of worshiping the true Elohim, they worship gods and goddesses that were created within human minds. [Romans 1:25] Elohim consistently and plainly banned worship of Gentile gods and goddesses. Contrary to modern pluralistic thinking, this means that there is a difference between Elohim and the gods and goddesses of other nations. Plainly said, Baal is not the same as Yahweh, just as Ashtoreth is not the same as Eloah. Inanna, Isis and Lilith are not Eloah called by other names – they are truly “other gods”.
Throughout the history of Israel, the nation waxed and waned through cycles of the worship of “other gods”. Elohim’s condemnation of their practices focused on whom Israel was worshipping, and how they were worshipping. Elohim did not condemn reverence for Eloah – the Feminine Deity of Israel. Worship of the star goddess Ashtoroth [also spelled Ashtoreth] was denounced, however. Five times in the book of Jeremiah, a goddess of the Gentiles is referred to by the title “Queen of Heaven”. In other cultures the star goddess was known as Astarte, Ishtar, and Ostara. An example of censuring the worship of other gods is found in Deuteronomy 32:17. The wicked people were condemned for sacrificing “to demons that are not Eloah. These were new gods who came from nearby – gods your ancestors never worshipped.”
Asherah is another name for the same goddess. In the King James translation of the Bible, asherah is translated as “grove” or “groves”, but the contextual meaning is usually “a place to worship [the goddess Asherah]”, or “idols [of Asherah]”. Asherah was the companion of Baal. “And the children of Israel did evil?and forgot Yahweh their Elohim, and served Baals and Asherahs.” [Judges 3:7] “And the king commanded Hilkiah the High Priest?to bring out of the temple of Yahweh all the vessels that were made for Baal and for Asherah?and he burned them.” [2nd Kings 23:4]
Another goddess is mentioned in Isaiah 34:14, in a purely negative way. She is Lilith, a winged goddess or demoness of the ancient Sumerians. The Semitic root lil means ‘wind’ or ‘spirit’. In the King James translation, Lilith is called “screech owl”. Other translations are “night terror”, “night hag”, “night demon”, “goddess of the night”, or “maiden of desolation”.

Praying to Eloah

Having become aware of this previously hidden mystery of Eloah, many will wonder about their own personal relationship to Her. Scriptures does provide guidance in this regard. It is appropriate to pray to Eloah, for example.
“My desire is that Shaddai would answer me.” [Job 31:35] “Oh that I might have my request, and that [Eloah] would grant me the thing that I long for!” [Job 6:8] “He will pray to [Eloah] who has restored him to favor.” [Job 33:26] “I shall say to [Eloah], ‘Do not condemn me; tell me what Your case is against me.” [Job 10:2] My friends scorn me, and my eyes pour out tears unto [Eloah]. [Job 16:20] “I want to speak to [Shaddai]; I wish to argue my case in front of [El].” [Job 13:3] “Seek [El], and plead with Shaddai.” [Job 8:5] “[The Wicked say] ‘What is the point of serving Shaddai? What shall we gain from praying to [Her]?'” [Job 21:15] “Then Shaddai will be all your delight, and you shall lift your face to [Eloah]. You will pray and [She] will hear.” [Job 22:26-27] “I am one who calls on [Eloah] and expects an answer.” [Job 12:4]

The Spirit of Elohim

Elohim as the Holy One acted to create the world, and sustains the universe. Elohim hears and answers prayers, blesses the Righteous, and punishes the Wicked. Elohim is the source of Life and Light. Elohim, as One God, as well as the Father, Son, and Eloah Spirit individually, are worthy of praise and worship. Each One within Elohim is referred to as ‘the Rock’.
Within Elohim, there is a hierarchy – an order and a division of responsibility within the Godhead. Each member has a role to play. We remember that Elohim became the Father and the Son and the Spirit – each with particular characters and tasks.
The Father is the Source of the power within the Godhead – distributing it through the Spirit and the Son and the Elect. The Father is the One who covenants with individuals and nations. The specific ‘work of the Father’ is focused on making and fulfilling the terms of the Covenant [including the gathering and restoration of Israel]. The Father directs the Son and the Spirit, and is, in that sense, supreme.
The Messiah is our Kinsman-Redeemer, and the Firstborn. He is the Bridegroom of the Church [Bride]. He is God in the flesh. He broke the bonds of death, making the resurrection possible for all people. Messiah was the ultimate sacrificial Lamb, paying the penalty of sin for all those who will have faith in Him, as well as those who are ignorant of the Plan of Redemption. The Messiah is our Shepherd, our High Priest, and Chief Judge. He is the Atonement for our sins.
Eloah is the Holy Spirit; She unites mankind with Elohim. She is the medium through which spiritual gifts are manifested. The Spirit of Wisdom gives instruction, as well as interpretation and understanding. She is the Comforter. She convinces and convicts. Through the Spirit of Eloah comes revelation and inspiration. The power of Elohim is manifested through the Spirit. Eloah resides within the hearts of the Righteous.
El Shaddai is more delicate that the Father or the Son, and is safeguarded. The sin against the Holy Spirit is unpardonable. [Matthew 12:32; Alma 39:6 (19:8-9)] Unlike the Father [Yahweh] and Son [Yahshua], Her personal name is never revealed [perhaps to prevent it from being blasphemed].

Rosh Chodesh

A particularly suitable time to specially honor Eloah is at the time of the New Moon. Rosh Chodesh means both ‘month’ and ‘new moon’. Kiddush levanah means ‘sanctification of the moon’. The moon is feminine in gender, and is symbolically linked with womanhood and motherhood. [Genesis 37:9; Isaiah 13:10, Ezekiel 32:7, Matthew 24:29, Mark 13:24] “And then [Elohim created] the moon, ever punctual, to mark the times, an everlasting sign. It is the moon that signals the feasts, a luminary that wanes after being full. The month derives its name from hers; she waxes wonderfully in her phases – banner of the hosts on high, shining in the vault of heaven.” [Ecclesiasticus 43:6-8]
Traditionally, women, in particular, celebrate their own femininity and the femininity of Eloah during the ordinances of Kiddush Levanah [Rosh Chodesh]. According to Hebrew tradition, the observance of Rosh Chodesh was given particularly to women, and women did [and do] observe it as a Sabbath. It is appropriate to identify more closely with Eloah as we celebrate “the ordinances of the moon”.

Summary

The intention of this article has been to demonstrate that there is unquestionably a feminine aspect within Elohim. The Divine Feminine is known as Eloah, El Shaddai, Wisdom [also Hochmah or Sophia], and the Holy Spirit. She is the Goddess ‘concealed’ within the Hebrew Scriptures. She is part of the One True God [Who is beyond our complete comprehension]. Spiritual Israel has justifiable reason to worship, praise and give honor to Eloah, the Holy Spirit, Who, with the Father and Son, are One God. The Elect are not permitted to honor other goddesses, such as Ashtoreth or Asherah, but only El Shaddai – the Feminine within Elohim.
and still many deny truth

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tina
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tina

Personally, I have noticed the atheist denying God and Holy Spirit and Jesus, not the Christians.

Paradise
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Paradise

I lost ten pounds just scrolling down. I am a christian and I believe in the holy spirit but not as a person in the trinity. The holy spirit is Gods active force, kinda like electricity.

repentandlive1961
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repentandlive1961

your fruity

kate86
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kate86

first you wrote way way to much for me to even want to read what your talking about. second i’m christian and the church we go to doesn’t deny the holy spirt… we just don’t pray to it. The bible says we need to pray only to the lord jesus christ. But we do praise the holy spirt, we don’t deny it. lat why would the lord make the holy spirt a specific sex it a spirt all around us its every thing around us and the spirt is the lord not “part of him” it is him in a… Read more »

Mama Jugalette
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Mama Jugalette

I really don’t have any sort of answer to give, per se, but this is some of the most enlightening and enlightened text on spirituality I have ever read! Kudos, my friend, and thank you for disproving the myth that all of us who sign on to these websites are idiots!

norman7774
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norman7774

Denying the Holy spirit is because it is something that they cannot see.. something that they cannot smell.. something that they cannot touch… and if none of the above, it is difficult for one to believe. It all goes back to: Believe in me