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Those who know, do not preach. Does who preach, do not know. -Lao Tzu?

In the words of Lao Tzu, 5th century BCE:
“Those who know, do not preach. Does who preach, do not know…”

Does this phrase transcend the test of time and still ring true today?
“It is preaching about not preaching, and therefore moronic at best.”

Lao Tzu didn’t create a rigid set of doctrines, and merely suggested to his students to go out into the world and find their own path in life.
“Really? That’s like letting kids loose in a library without teaching them literary theory or any critical thinking skills. They may read a book, but they will not be educated.”

Preaching is not the same as teaching, whereas preaching doesn’t allow for critical thinking. Your concept of the Judeo-Christianity would be a representation of this through your other answers. As a Christian, you certainly don’t use critical thinking to doubt the divinity of Jesus.

As for Lao Tzu, his philosophy was a reaction to the rigid teachings of Confucious. His entire point was to serve as an opposition to the analetical methods of Confucianism.

9 Comments

  • Yes, I do believe so. People that preach and go on and on usually cannot give a logical reasoning for any of it, just “that is what God would want” or “because that is what it is supposed to be like” etc. If you truly know something there is no reason to preach, you state your cause, back it up with facts and research, what else is left. You cannot dispute fact, you can dispute gibberish which in my opinion is what preaching is. There are many uneducated preachers, but I highly doubt you will find a preacher with a degree from Harvard.

  • Absolutely. It’s wisdom. For those who don’t know it’s for them to want to seek, therefore preaching is not necessary.

  • I like it. I have always thought that a quiet humble person is of the utmost character and has the knowledge that has given them inner-peace therefore they do not need to talk about it or atleast volunteer it. I strive towards that but my selfishness makes me speek out in hopes of positive feedback and recognition. I know that isn’t right, but subconciously I want the attention.

  • It is preaching about not preaching, and therefore moronic at best.

    Edit: Really? That’s like letting kids loose in a library without teaching them literary theory or any critical thinking skills. They may read a book, but they will not be educated.

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