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In buddhism, what happens when you are taken out of the circle of life?

by Emi-lou:

Apparently, when you die you come back as another human or an animal. this is called the Circle of Life. You can only be taken out of this circle when you have earned enlightenment, but when you have been taken out, what happens?

Answer by Use your brain
be Avatars

6 COMMENTS

  1. I’m not sure of the terminology that a Buddhist would use. But, it should be similar as to the Hindu beliefs of after achieving enlightenment, you are removed from the cycle of reincarnation, and your soul becomes one with the Brahma.

  2. You mean physical life or? Basically – consciousness, that what represents the personality, the Ego, lives on regardless. Only in Hinduism it says that a human may be reborn as an animal… according to what was achieved in that life regarding how good in moral terms etc it was.
    Buddhism states that once a soul is “entrapped” in a human body after the death/dissolution of that physical body rebirth will only be possible in a physical body – this contrary to Hiduism.
    “You can only be taken out of this circle when you have earned enlightenment, but when you have been taken out, what happens?”
    When one has reached TOTAL enlightenment, then the cycle of reincarnating is broken. That occurance is extremely rare!!! There have been only a few like Budhha, Krishna etc who accomplished that feat. Enlightenment is a relative term. There are many degrees in-between. Total enlightenment is the merging of the purged soul – purged of everything pertaining to the person(ality)…. even the longing for god and “salvation”. It can be compared to the raindrop falling into the ocean. The raindrop being what can be termed the person, individuality by itself which goes through all the many cycles of different conditions, lives, is then united without any attributes into/with the “ocean of life” without any differentiation….. where it all began.
    As to all the infinite in-between stages of spiritual enlightenment, that determines the length of time in the non-physical on any of the different planes of non-physical existence. There are Many of them. The higher a soul has risen – and there are still issues to be resolved, the longer it takes to have to come back and tie up any lose ends so to say. Karma takes care of that. Karma itself is not just action and reaction, tit for tat – it is more complicated than that.
    On Very high levels of consciousness a highly enlightened soul may decide to descend into the physical solely voluntarily to help out mankind on the brink of descending into (spiritual) darkness….. become an avatar, spiritual teacher.
    I leave it at this short answer. Hope it helps your understanding….

  3. When you speak about taken out you are speaking about Nibbana which is not taken out , but cessation.
    Buddha taught the reality of Anatta (absence of a self-inherent nature) anatta, that is the absence of “in itself”, applicable to everything, every idea, every characteristic and virtually all mental or material phenomena
    Buddha denies the existence of a continuum of consciousness, a continuum, an identity or a self-inherent nature. He denies the existence of a continuous, immutable, eternal substance or soul , which would remain unsullied, immaculate
    That which the Buddha experienced (Nibbana) is the complete cessation of all vision, audition, olfaction, tasting, touch and, something new, of all mental consciousness, in fact, all the perceptions.
    That which remains lies beyond words (beyond the range of mind and speech), but, truly speaking, it is something. It is so much a thing that he puts it into in the category of things that constitute this universe.
    He said that this universe is composed of four things, which are universal. They are universal in the sense that they appear everywhere, that they are everywhere and that they can be known everywhere.
    There are all material phenomena, generally called matter. There are all mental phenomena, all these perceptions, sensations, ideations, conceptions, etc.
    There is consciousness that precisely has the faculty of cognizing these material and mental phenomena.
    Finally, we find this fourth thing (Nibbana) that is one of them and truly speaking a reality. This is something that we do not see. We do not see it because we hear sounds, because we see images or because we do indulge in spiritual, mystical or transcendental experiences. We do not see it because we are conscious of something. Of what are we conscious? We are conscious of material and mental phenomena.
    ————————————–…
    To help you further in understanding this very subtle teaching
    I copy paste this part from *accestoinsight.org*
    ——->>>>>>>>
    What happens to one who has fully realized Nibbana?
    [Aggivessana Vacchagotta:] “But, Master Gotama, the monk whose mind is thus released: Where does he reappear?”
    [The Buddha:] “‘Reappear,’ Vaccha, doesn’t apply.”
    “In that case, Master Gotama, he does not reappear.”
    “‘Does not reappear,’ Vaccha, doesn’t apply.”
    “…both does & does not reappear.”
    “…doesn’t apply.”
    “…neither does nor does not reappear.”
    “…doesn’t apply.”
    “How is it, Master Gotama, when Master Gotama is asked if the monk reappears… does not reappear… both does & does not reappear… neither does nor does not reappear, he says, ‘…doesn’t apply’ in each case. At this point, Master Gotama, I am befuddled; at this point, confused. The modicum of clarity coming to me from your earlier conversation is now obscured.”
    “Of course you’re befuddled, Vaccha. Of course you’re confused. Deep, Vaccha, is this phenomenon, hard to see, hard to realize, tranquil, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced by the wise. For those with other views, other practices, other satisfactions, other aims, other teachers, it is difficult to know. That being the case, I will now put some questions to you. Answer as you see fit. What do you think, Vaccha: If a fire were burning in front of you, would you know that, ‘This fire is burning in front of me’?”
    “…yes…”
    “And suppose someone were to ask you, Vaccha, ‘This fire burning in front of you, dependent on what is it burning?’ Thus asked, how would you reply?”
    “…I would reply, ‘This fire burning in front of me is burning dependent on grass & timber as its sustenance.'”
    “If the fire burning in front of you were to go out, would you know that, ‘This fire burning in front of me has gone out’?”
    “…yes…”
    “And suppose someone were to ask you, ‘This fire that has gone out in front of you, in which direction from here has it gone? East? West? North? Or south?’ Thus asked, how would you reply?”
    “That doesn’t apply, Master Gotama. Any fire burning dependent on a sustenance of grass and timber, being unnourished – from having consumed that sustenance and not being offered any other – is classified simply as ‘out’ (unbound).”
    “Even so, Vaccha, any physical form by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of form, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea. ‘Reappears’ doesn’t apply. ‘Does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Both does & does not reappear’ doesn’t apply. ‘Neither reappears nor does not reappear’ doesn’t apply.
    “Any feeling… Any perception… Any mental fabrication…
    “Any consciousness by which one describing the Tathagata would describe him: That the Tathagata has abandoned, its root destroyed, made like a palmyra stump, deprived of the conditions of development, not destined for future arising. Freed from the classification of consciousness, Vaccha, the Tathagata is deep, boundless, hard to fathom, like the sea.”

  4. Why are you asking ME? We will not know until we arrive at that point. I do want to clarify … enlightenment is not “earned”. The word “earned” implies that someone holds our “enlightenment” and gives it to us only after we have their criteria. The truth of it is that we have to do it for ourselves. It’s like learning how to ride a bike … only we can can learn how to do it for ourselves. This is why is is commonly called “attaining” enlightenment, or “reaching” enlightenment.
    In Mahayana Buddhism, the practitioners vow to keep on being reborn once they have attained enlightenment, so that they can help guide others reach that state. Until ALL beings have attained enlightenment. In other schools of Buddhism … I don’t know …
    The responder “Dhamma” probably practices Theravadan Buddhism, which I am unfamiliar with. But in Tibetan Buddhism they DO teach that a human can be reborn in any of the other 5 realms, including as an animal. That the human rebirth is rare and precious.

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