My wife has been doing Reiki which costs a great deal (another issue entirely), but her and her Reiki master acknowledge that this is energy is “mystical” and “miraculous”.

Now if they are right and there is magical mystical energy all around me, do you suppose there are Reiki masters that can use it to harm? Like shut down someone’s liver from across the room?

And if so, could they tech me to cast magic spells with it?

10 Comments

  • check out http://www.mirsufi.org for a real fraud in action. This man claims 30 years experience teaching in the mystical path of Sufism having been ‘instructed’ by his master to become ‘Grand Master’.

    For the record he has no such lengthy pedigree, although he was a humble dervish for many years until he went into the business of healing, and then hit on the idea of combining Sufism in a bizarre mix of healing theories.

    Most of his ‘spiritual’ writings are of paltry quality although he has copied many of the features of his former Sufi order- Thursday and Sunday meetings. Some habits down hard…
    He happens to charge for his meetings by asking for a donation.

    He did memorably say years ago now, that the best way to make money was to become a spiritual guru and he has done very well with the invention of SufiReiki. Presumably copyrighted.

    Like the above I am very sceptical. There are genuine ‘Masters’ out there but this joker appointed himself with his own brazen title ‘Grand Master’ having never been appointed by successorship…

  • Despite our very vocal pseudoskeptics’ opinions about Reiki the question is weather or not Reiki can cause harm and weather a Reiki master could teach someone to cast magic spells. As the previous poster states most Reiki practitioners believe they are just a conduit for Reiki and do not control where it goes. Reiki practitioners also believe the person can either accept it or refuse it. Medical studies on Reiki have shown no negative side effects. Although some people report feeling bad after a treatment it is usually attributed to the release of negative energy. If you follow the theories about energy medicine there is no truly negative energy but energy with a lower frequency. It is like looking the electromagnetic spectrum with x-rays and other dangerous forms of energy at one end and then visible light at the other end. So either way Reiki can not cause harm even if it is real or not. As for a Reiki master teaching you spells the answer is NO. In Reiki there is no use of spells. Spellings being the use of intent and other accessories like candles, etc. In summary YES to the first question and NO to the last.

  • IF your wife and her master are right:

    Reiki practitioners believe that they are, for healing purposes, channeling energy to a recipient, but that the body and/or energy field of the recipient decides what to do with it. The Reiki practitioner therefore has no control over the energy other than where to channel it and can never override the recipients will or need. So to answer your first question: No, they cannot use it to harm.

    However, in their belief, the Reiki practitioner can channel Reiki energy to specific purposes or areas of his or her life to increase the likelihood of positive results. That is, in a way, the same as magic. So to answer your second question: Yes, they can teach you to cast magic spells, but more in the form of a prayer and not the elaborate “circle with candles, incense, cauldron and costume” environment.

    IF your wife and her master are wrong, the answer to both of your questions are of course NO!

  • They misuse the term ‘energy’ which is an attribute of something, a measurement of something’s ability to do work. It can’t magically exist all around you.

    Its a good question, I have asked this of reiki masters many times. They cannot produce one single shred of evidence for their healing energy. And Reiki does not perform better than placebo when properly tested.

    I suspect what is going on, is the people who run these expensive courses are knowingly ripping off their students.

    PS: Tony’s answer is a non sequitur. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non_sequitur_(logic)

    EDIT: Tony those terms are great, but you commit another fallacy – argument from ad hominem. They do not provide evidence for the existence of Reiki energy.

  • I hate to do this, but my I think my answer will conflict with everyone else here. It will however answer your question!
    Basically, I firmly believe that “qi” exists and can be used in healing, but I also think reiki is a horrible energy work system.
    The reason reiki is “bad” stems from the fact it’s an extremely primitive and poorly designed energetic system but supported and elevated by a semi new age cult mindset.
    Reiki was developed by some japanese guy who was trying to figure out what the healing energy Christ used was and then had a “profound” insight on a mountain top to push your aura a bit on someone else (which does a bit healing wise) and then market it as the magical sacred healing energy.
    Since people like stuff which is easy and doesn’t take a lot of hard work (to become a real “chi master” typically takes decades of diligent work, whereas being a reiki master is a question of a quick attunement by another master), it’s become extremely popular and the most well known energy healing system.
    It’s two major flaws in my opinion are
    a) it’s simplicity, faith based mindset and inability to fix advanced problems (which leads to people having a bad opinion of other energy arts)
    b) it’s lack of incorporating methods to protect the practitioner from picking up bad energy from the patient (most healers that regularly work with patients tend to get sick over time; this is one major pro of just prescribing drugs!). Since there is an attitude that what you’re working with in Reiki is sacred, no emphasis is given on protecting oneself, which in turn leads to it often being very bad for the practitioner.

    As far as your other question goes; I have come across many people claiming to have the ability to use energy to harm people; most did not. The few that did all told me the bad karma attached to doing so is hideous, and if you are planning to harm someone you are much better off spiritually just picking up a gun and not getting the energetic world involved.

    Hope that helps!

  • No, because “qi “and Reiki Energy is nonexistent mystical nonsense with no scientific basis.

    Reiki is basically a Japanese version of energy healing. They claim that all health problems are caused by imbalances and that people can be treated by correcting these imbalances. There is no evidence to support this nonsense. There is no evidence that this sort of energy even exists.

    Any evidence is purely anecdotal.

    EDIT:
    Tony: You frequently try to discredit sites such as SBM and quackwatch yet you never discredit the information contained in the site…..that actually discredits you!

    You have a book to sell and a website to promote, people should view ANYTHING you say with extreme skepticism. Most of it is worthless nonsense anyway.

  • Reiki and qi is not likely to be able to help anyone cast spells nor is it likely to specifically cure. Likewise it is not likely to harm either. It might harm your wallet if the practitioner is a scammer, and they are surely out there.

    HOWEVER, just because Reiki or qi have not been understood or validated by today’s science does not mean they have no basis at all. There is much that today’s science does not understand or has not validated – the same as is true of the science of the day throughout history. We are constantly discovering new forces in nature and learning about things we previously did not know or understand. Look at dark matter, Higgs boson, string theory, etc. Regardless of how “advanced” the science of today is, the science of tomorrow will show it to be limited and have many discoveries today’s science has not yet made. Thus has it always been.

    Healing energy is little understood today, but it does exist and has been qualitatively and quantitatively measured. I certainly don’t claim to understand, but neither do I reject it. Who knows what we will discover about it in the future – and it could be that the science of the day comes to a much greater understanding and appreciation for things such as accupuncture, qi and Reiki.

    Quackwatch is a thoroughly discredited mainstream apologist and attack site. Any answer here that refers to that site or others like sciencebasedmedicine should automatically be viewed with extreme skepticism because those sites have an agenda to cast doubt on anything which has not been accepted and approved by mainstream medicine.

    Rhianna – another personal shot I see, and like much of what you post here it is based on your own personal bias and wrongful opinion. Anyone who takes the time to look at the 450 or so questions I have answered will see that I am not promoting my book or my website – but rather am promoting natural and alternative remedies which are safer, often more effective, and usually promote healing instead of managing symptoms and causing side effects like mainstream approved drugs do. FYI – It costs me money to take the time to answer questions here thoughtfully and in detail like I do and try to genuinely help. Money is not what motivates me. Helping people live longer, healthier and happier lives without getting trapped into a system of managed illness and mainstream drugs is what motivates me. Believe what you want, but I know the truth and so does everyone who knows me. If you really did know me you would be ashamed.

    Gary Y – Perhaps while you are looking up definitions you should also take a look at “ethnocentrism” and “temporocentrism” and the fallacies of both of them. Ethnocentrism is the assumption that one’s own culture is superior to others. Temporocentrism is the belief that one’s own time is more important than the past or present; it is the temporal equivalent of ethnocentrism. Both terms are appropriate to look at when one finds people who falsely assume that today’s science has all, or even most, of the answers.

  • Reiki energy is universal. Practitioners always channel it to the highest good of the recipient – they cannot channel it to harm nor can they channel it to help or “cure” a specific problem.

    We don’t always know what is best for us or what is needed at any one time – the energy goes where it is most needed. Nor does one have to be a “master” to help individuals by channeling the energy. All ethical practitioners know this and humility is one of our guiding principles.

  • No.

    There’s no such thing as ‘Reiki energy’. Reiki is trying to con you into believing there is a mystical force which cannot be detected by the most sensitive of the world’s instruments and trillions of NASA dollars, yet your wife is happily juggling it around at will in the comfort of her own home. Think about it: It cannot be detected, felt, measured or analysed by anything, yet these people think they can “channel” it or otherwise control it!

    Clearly this is ridiculous!

    I’m afraid that you (and her) have been victim to one of the standard alt med scams that regularly relieve people of vast sums of money in return for, well most of the time, just a piece of paper.

  • Ha ha! You are so dead on. Reiki is a complete scam and can neither heal nor harm. As far as I know no Reiki masters or practitioners believe it can be used for nefarious purposes like shutting down one’s liver. But if this energy actually did exist, then yes, you actually could use it to cast magical spells! No, wait a minute…practitioners get around that little loophole by claiming Reiki uses the healing energy of God, which is ONLY love and light…I forget how they twist sh*t like that for their own purposes…

    You have my deepest sympathies that your wife is wasting your money like this!

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