With so many workouts to choose from, it’s important to pick the right regimen to suit your lifestyle and fitness goals. What is the difference between yoga and Pilates, and what are the benefits of each one?

50 Comments

  • yoga can be more spiritual and revolves around meditating and serenity whereas pilates is like intense stretching and ivolves making muscles stronger.

  • What is yoga?
    Yoga is the best and most time-tested path to physical and mental well-being known to mankind. While some people think of yoga simply as physical exercise, it is actually a complete system for overall health and well-being. It includes everything from physical postures, personal hygiene, and a healthy diet to premeditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. The most advanced forms of meditation and self-realization are also a part of yoga. Wai Lana’s workouts focus on yoga’s physical techniques.

    What is Pilates?
    Derived from ancient yoga asanas, the Pilates exercise system was formulated by Joseph Pilates over 80 years ago for more specific and limited purposes. Although Pilates is not a complete balanced or holistic exercise and health system, it is quite useful. Pilates focuses mainly on cultivating core strength in the body and lengthening the spine. Practiced for decades by dancers, Pilates has become popular in recent years for its largely aesthetic body sculpting effect. Pilates can be a valuable tool for enhancing strength, definition, and good posture in partnership with Wai Lana Yoga. Click here to explore Wai Lana’s Pilates Yoga line of products

  • Yoga is bound up in Eastern religious metaphysics and is not an innocent form of relaxing the body and the mind. The goal of yoga is the same as that of Hinduism, which is realizing that one is Brahman, the underlying impersonal God of the Universe in Hinduism.

    Yoga is marketed in the guise of an innocent, healthful technique, but it is far from it. H.Rieker warns: “Yoga is not a trifling jest if we consider that any misunderstanding in the practice of yoga can mean death or insanity,” and that if the breath is “prematurely exhausted, there is immediate danger of death for the yogi” (Rieker, The Yoga of Light (Los Angeles: Dawn House) 1974, p. 135). Blackouts, strange trance states, or insanity are listed from even “the slightest mistake…” of practicing yoga. Swami Prabhavananda’s Yoga and Mysticism lists brain injury, incurable disease, and insanity as potential hazards of wrong yoga practice.

  • i prefer pilates. it seems to be more effective.
    but i would choose yoga as a relaxation due to stress or building of emotions.

  • Yoga( Kriya yoga Hq in california & India) Is a spiritual yoga suited for body, mind, & soul includes exercises& Meditation which suits Eastern & Western life style.Pillates is purely for body developement only. NOTE: Hata Yoga is full of ASANAS, (needs teacher) for–body management.

  • Yoga consists more in stretching and balancing the body, and strengthening too, but by taking specific positions. Pilates is a workout, comprising abs, exercises for the bottom, etc. They are similar in the aspect that they use correct breathing techniques, but those are different too: in yoga you fill your body like a balloon as you inhale, in pilates you must inhale without bloating your tummy with air.

  • pilates is limited only for bodily development were as yoga
    is a complete science of mind body and soul…its the mother of all excercises and is capable of taking humanity towards enlightenment

  • well my girlfriend and a coworker of mine took pilates in college and they both loved it… they said it kinda made them feel more relaxed after each work out yet the both lost wait and got a slimmer body… i believe pilates is great!!! and now my girlfriend is great in streaching and doing moves when we make love

  • Yoga is a stretching meditative style that concentrates on breathing and the flow of energy. pilates is more of a work out and muscle conditioning.

  • yoga is an ancient mind, body and spirit exercise practised by the yogis of ancient india. yoga’s popularity increased in the 1960’s and has since become a mainstream form of physical exercise. though, instructors still maintain that the yoga they teach and practise also unites the mind, body and spirit as it did for the rishis / yogis of ancient times.

    hatha yoga (the yoga that is taught and practised today), was originally practised to prepare for the raja yoga. hatha yoga is a physical purification which renders the body fit for higher meditation practises. yogis / rishis would practise long hours of meditation. hatha is really 2 words: ha and tha, meaning sun and moon, which were considered energy channels of the psycho-spiritual subtle body that must be fully operational in order to attain a state of samadhi. in other respects, hatha yoga follows the same principles as the raja yoga of including moral restraint and spiritual observances.

    the benefits of [hatha] yoga are many. it enhances flexibility and overall strength. it also improves joint strength. the body’s own weight is used for resistance and a lot of concentration is required to flow from one posture to the next. yoga makes you aware of your posture (how you sit, stand, walk, etc), alignment (of your joints, how your body parts depend on one another, etc), and the way you move in general. apart from its physical benefits, it not only refreshes the mind but it also helps to de-stress the mind and body in a high-stress environment.

    the history of pilates is relatively short as it was created in the 1920’s by a german, joseph pilates, who built upon rehab techniques he used on wounded WWI soldiers. it became popular with dancers who used it to recover from injuries and became a mainstream form of fitness since the mid-1990’s.

    pilates also incorporates many of the same goals of controlled movement and cocentration, but the major difference between itself and yoga is that it not only has a full ‘course’ of matwork, but it incorporates exercises on pilates machines. pilates focuses on the core (abdominal section), as it is considered to stabilise and strengthen the person from inside out. unlike other exercise programmes (aerobics or kick boxing, for example) it works the entire body and focuses on quality instead of quantity. the emphasis centres around strengthening the core muscles, improving posture, balance and flexibility, lengthening the spine and gaining overall strength.

  • yoga is a slow moving exercise to center your body so it can focus on itself and burn calories in a more effective matter. plus u use a mat and no weight and/or machines during the process. Pilate’s is more of a movement workout because they put you on a machine to stretch u different directions the expand muscle movement and heart flow. now yoga does this too but Pilate’s does it in a way where at the same time you are stretching, you are using different levels of resistance to build muscle memory and elongate your body.

  • sorry 😛 just wanna increase my points 😛

    Yoga and Pilates start from different letters /)
    \peace/

  • pilates was taken from yoga.
    pilates focuses on strength and working out.
    Yoga focuses on your mind, helps you concentrate, get more flexible, and gain a lot of strength.
    I would definitely recommend yoga.

  • yoga is more of a stretching/meditation exercise whereas pilates works more directly with your muscles to define and tone

  • Differences And Similarities Between Pilates And Yoga

    Pilates is a type of exercise that is really gaining a toe hold in popular culture. Alongside yoga, many people are beginning to realize the merits of a low intensity, calming form of exercise. The following are the differences and similarities between Pilates and yoga.

    * Where Pilates is merely a system of exercise, yoga is more of an all-encompassing activity that is not limited to one’s exercise. While yoga does incorporate many aspects of fitness which are often used in Pilates, those who practice yoga see it as more of a lifestyle than an activity. Yoga subscribers work on breathing control, maintaining a proper diet, and several other disciplines in order to find a more perfect harmony in their lives. Pilates, on the other hand, focuses almost completely on the physical aspect of the yoga activities as well as other exercises.
    * Both yoga and Pilates place a certain emphasis on the breathing patterns of an individual. Proper breathing is stressed by instructors in order to more properly benefit from the exercise. There is a slight difference between the two breathing methods that the differing practices recommend: in Pilates, the participator is told to inhale through the nose, and exhale through the mouth. In yoga, on the other hand, breathing is only permissible in through the nose, and out through the nose.
    * While both of the activities incorporate some outside tools in order to more accurately perform the exercises, yoga definitely requires more. Whereas pilates workouts may only require a pilates ball and a workout mat, yoga incorporates the usage of many different tools, including blankets, blocks, and straps in order to reach the full potential of the activity.
    * Perhaps the most obvious difference between pilates and yoga is that yoga is an ancient practice that originated in India over 5,000 years ago, while pilates is a relatively new phenomenon. Pilates was developed and popularized by Joseph H. Pilates and his wife Clara in the early to mid-twentieth century. Pilates created his famous method while working as a nurse during the First World War in Great Britain. He developed his series of exercises and routines to help rehabilitate injured and immobile soldiers. Pilates was inspired by the ancient asana of yoga, and tried to incorporate this aspect of yoga into his own routine.
    * Both of the activities incorporate the same exercises and need to develop ‘the core’. The core is what pilates subscribers refer to when they speak of the abdomen, the pelvic region, and the lower back of an individual. Development in this area is tantamount for those who study pilates, but it is just a small piece of the puzzle to those involved in yoga.
    * Another of the main differences between pilates and yoga has to do with the underlying philosophy of each. Although they are both described as mind-body formats, pilates is generally considered to be more of an exercise than lifestyle choice. Yoga is not meant to operate as a simple exercise and body conditioning routine, but instead as a lifestyle philosophy. Pilates was first adopted as a physical conditioning routine by professional dancers and gymnasts. Like yoga, pilates also seeks to unite the mind, body, and spirit, but does not delve into the meditation and relaxation aspects like yoga does.
    * Both yoga and pilates do indeed help participants deal with stress and cultivate relaxation, although only pilates is geared specifically toward building all-over body muscle and tone. Also, pilates also has a strong rehabilitation component that yoga practice does not.

  • Over the past decade, people have increasingly come to see fitness as a mind-body experience. This trend is an excellent one; a mind-body approach to exercise keeps you interested longer and in the long run, it’s more effective too. The mind controls the body – if you engage your awareness, you perform any task more effectively. And if your mind’s engaged there’s less room for boredom to set in. All forms of physical fitness can, and should, utilize both mind and body, but there are many exercise techniques which are just naturally mind-body experiences. The two most popular are – as you no doubt know – Yoga and Pilates. People who are interested in adding a mind-body component to their exercise routine often ask, “which is best – Yoga or Pilates?”

    Actually, there’s no real “Yoga versus Pilates” debate – each one has a different focus and approach. Whether you gravitate towards one or the other really depends on your personality and own personal philosophies. If you have the time you can even do both without a lot of overlap – your muscles and flexibility will be trained from different angles and actually benefit. Most people, however, only have time for one or the other. Here’s a brief overview to help you decide which one is right for you.

    Keep in mind that neither discipline is new – Yoga originated in India and has been around for thousands of years. It was brought to the Western world more than a hundred years ago and was popularized by people like Paramahansa Yogananda and Indra Devi in the middle of the twentieth century. It has increased in popularity since the 1960s counter-culture movement and today it is a mainstream form of fitness. Pilates is a mere youngster by comparison – it was created in the 1920s by a German, Joseph H. Pilates, who built upon rehabilitative techniques he used on wounded soldiers during World War I. When he relocated to the United States prior to World War II, dancers soon embraced the movements, which helped them recover quickly from injuries and made their bodies long and lean. Only since the mid-1990s has Pilates made inroads into mainstream fitness, but it has been catching on very quickly for the same reasons that dancers liked it so much – nearly everyone wants long, lean muscles, combined with truly functional fitness.

    The biggest difference between Yoga and Pilates is more philosophical than physical. While Pilates takes a mind-body approach to exercise, Yoga’s view involves mind, body and spirit. Its principles come from Hindu ideals and its approach is decidedly Eastern in nature. In reality, this should bother few people outside of those with fundamentalist religious beliefs – Yoga’s Yamas and Niyamas (suggestions for living) bear some similarities in principle to Christianity’s Ten Commandments (they’re not quite as stern as the Commandments, however). Yoga’s teachings encourage us to be kind to all beings, including ourselves, and to search for balance in our lives and lifestyle. You won’t find any of this in a Pilates class, which only focuses on mental concentration, breathing and movement.

    The physical differences between Yoga and Pilates derive from their contrasting outlooks. Yoga’s approach is holistic, emphasizing balance in all areas – equally strengthening all muscle groups, creating mental and physical balance, encouraging moderation in everything. Pilates mainly works on the core muscles in your trunk (called the powerhouse), and building strength there above all. Yoga, for the most part, involves static poses, which are held while exploring your breathing, physical feelings and emotions. Pilates is about moving in ways that help strengthen your powerhouse, including your stabilizing muscles. Yoga emphasizes flexibility over building strength (although it enhances both), while Pilates emphasizes toning over flexibility (but, again, it enhances both).

    The choice between Yoga and Pilates depends on what you are looking for. If you want an exercise that improves flexibility while toning your muscles – especially those abs – then Pilates is probably your better choice. If you want to concentrate a bit more on flexibility and a little less on toning (perhaps you’re getting your strength training elsewhere), and you are also searching for something that helps reduce stress and gives you an opportunity for some quiet time, then you should try Yoga. If you have strong religious convictions, you may also be better off with Pilates, although many Yoga classes these days offer little or no philosophy and are acceptable for all religious persuasions. Either choice is good – you’re enhancing your body’s health in a way no other form of exercise can accomplish.

  • Yoga is really for stretching and relaxation. Strength isn’t really secondary, but it is not the main purpose for many variations of Yoga. Pilates is for strengthening purposes primarily. There isn’t much of a relaxation component, but the stretching does play a role.

  • Yoga, is more complete than pilates, since yoga is a complete system of life, while pilates is just a workout.

    Yoga, is more than the poses that you see the gyms here in the U.S.

    Yoga in the U.S. is too westernized, and is only a shadow of what real yoga is.

  • In brief:
    Yoga = breath and think while preforming body contortions
    Pilate’s = stretch on a ball and try not to fall

  • in short i wil say here ,you cant compare yoga with pilates exersise series.yoga is a big and proved since to know yourself where is breathing and meditation and how to live and behave others all include and pilates is just some similer exersice to make you physical fit only.
    can say pilates is a one little son of yoga only.

  • Well this is going to sound really CRAZY but if you are a female, I suggest trying both at home first because many women including myself have “queef” experiences from doing yoga and pilates. But I really like to do both anyway. To me, Pilates is more challenging then Yoga.

  • Yoga is full mind body, Pilates is abdomen/back.
    One is a money maker, by design, the other is a way of life,being and interacting in harmony with everything and anything.
    One is Capitalized, one is not.
    Capitalism makes strange bedfellows with good.

  • For the west yoga is mostly for physical well being. In the east it was started by ancient sages as an adjunct to spiritual practices.

    For the sages the physical body was a necessary evil. They wanted minimal interference from it, so that they could go on with their quest for realization.

    Unfortunately, their poor eating habits (when they ate at all) combined with an exteremely circumscribed life style was not conducive to a very healthy body.

    They had to invent a relatively static directed postures that can be done anywhere in the jungles without any equipment.

    So was created hata yoga.

    Pilates is a modified form of postures aimed more at physical toning up.

    If the aim is predominantly physical well being, either a simpler set of hata yoga postures or pilates should do equally well. If both or being opted, do on alternate days.

  • In my own personal opinion, Yoga is more of a meditating and spiritual workout. It requires more stretching movements along with controlled breathing and focus. Pilates helps tone the body along with pushing it to do more strengthening workouts. They are both very calm and soothing workouts it just depends on what you prefer.

    🙂

  • both workouts are exceptional, and i suggest doing both regardless of the level of difficulty they may be. however, when i did pilates at 24 hour fitness, i thought it was a bit more rigorous than yoga. i’m a ‘lil chubby, so i guess that’s expected, haha. but i love the peacefulness, tranquility, and meditation that goes along with yoga. i think the benefits are so great from both workouts, and it gives you a sense of who you are even more when you complete those 1 hour workouts. good job, girl!

  • I think yoga is more on postural and balancing. I really don’t enjoy it as much as pilates. Pilates concentrates with abs I like this a lot. Pilates makes u slim n look longer. I enjoy it really.

  • It seems that these days you can hardly turn on a television without hearing someone mention Pilates or Yoga. Articles on Pilates and Yoga fill numerous magazines and it seems “everyone who is anyone” is doing one or the other. Why all the excitement? What is so special about these techniques? What are the similarities and differences between Pilates and Yoga?

    Yoga, as we all know it, is aimed to unite the mind, the body, and the spirit. Yogis view that the mind and the body are one, and that if it is given the right tools and taken to the right environment, it can find harmony and heal itself. Yoga therefore is considered therapeutic. It helps you become more aware of your body’s posture, alignment and patterns of movement.

    It makes the body more flexible and helps you relax even in the midst of a stress stricken environment. This is one of the foremost reasons why people want to start practicing Yoga – to feel more fit, to be more energetic, be happier and peaceful. The Yoga movements are performed, mostly, in a group setting on a special Yoga mat with an aid of a Yoga instructor. The body’s own weight is used for resistance and a great deal of focus is accorded to the flow from one posture into the other. There are many different Yoga styles and they differ in their emphasis. No one style is better than the other. The Style you use is a matter of personal preference or a matter of need.

    Vinyasa Yoga, for example, makes use of modified Yoga Poses that are designed to meet the specific needs of an individual and to enhance healing, flexibility and strength of joints. The poses also intend to promote the feeling of well-being and strength. Practices may also include meditation, reflection, study and other classic elements, but the emphasis of this branch of Yoga practice is on coordinating breath and movement. As you can imagine, given the scope of practice, the inherent therapeutic applications and the heritage of the lineage, the training requirements for teacher certification are extensive.

    Pilates seek to reach much the same goals, also via a series of controlled movements. The major difference is that the Pilates technique not only has a full complement of matwork, but it incorporates work on the Pilates machines. The emphasis of the exercises is to strengthen the abdominals, improve posture, stabilize and lengthen the spine, improve balance and overall strength. Pilates gives you a longer, leaner, dancer-like line.

    Unlike many other training programs, Pilates works the whole body, emphasizing control, precision and concentration in both the mind and the body. Movements are not performed rapidly or repeated excessively instead, the focus is on quality not quantity. The abdominal muscles, lower back and buttocks (“powerhouse”) serve as the center of all movement, allowing the rest of the body to move freely. This focus on core stabilization makes one stronger from the inside out and is critical for the advancement of the client. The low impact nature of Pilates makes it ideal for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Its six principles-concentration, control, centering, breathing, flow and precision-train the body to move efficiently with minimal impact on the body. The balance between strength and flexibility creates a healthy, vigorous and symmetrical workout for all muscle groups resulting in a leaner, more balanced, and stronger body.

    If after reading about both techniques you are still left with a question of which of these two fitness techniques is right for you then here is the answer: Do them both in conjunction! The nature of the techniques makes it easy for them to complement each other. Get the stretch from Yoga and keep it from Pilates. Strengthen your abdominals on the reformer and watch your poses improve. Join the breathing techniques of Pilates and meditative aspect of Yoga into your daily routine and see the stress of your everyday life, begin to dissipate. Both techniques are time-proven, established, and with the help of an experienced instructor, you will surely reach the goals you set up for yourself!

  • Pilates you use things like weights and those big balls.
    Yoga you just need a mat.

  • Yoga is completely different than pilates. Yoga is about strength, flexibility and inner awareness whereas pilates is just about fitness. Pilates was developed as a way to keep people looking fit, and it is also essentially a marketing strategy to sell exercise videos. Yoga has a long history. It is almost like a religion. If you have a good instructor, yoga can be very rewarding, and I believe that it is more effective than pilates. I thought pilates was kind of boring and not very difficult since it only uses short outbursts of energy and you don’t hold moves long enough to gain any real strength. There are also many different types of yoga whereas pilates is rather limited.

  • I love the imagry of YOga.

    Pilates is stolen from the Kozaks who used the exercises originally for better horsmanship. The regime was imported by one of the King Louis (of France) who married a Rus’ Princess. Thereafter it was used to develop ballet dancing.

    I’m lying. But maybe its true.

  • In my experience pilates has more strengthening movements and a bit faster tempo, while yoga is more soothing and focuses more on balance and stretching. I love them both just depends what I am looking for in my workout that day.

  • Yoga is more for relaxation. It’s focuses on relaxing your mind and body, and is good for your system. Pilates is more like exercise. Its main task is to shape your muscles, and works parts of the body that are not usually used. Hope this helped a little!

  • i think pilates is about elongating head to toe while yoga is more about overall flexibility (up, down, sideways, backwards, all directions)

  • Yoga, as we all know it, is aimed to unite the mind, the body, and the spirit. Yogis view that the mind and the body are one, and that if it is given the right tools and taken to the right environment, it can find harmony and heal itself. Yoga therefore is considered therapeutic. It helps you become more aware of your body’s posture, alignment and patterns of movement.

    It makes the body more flexible and helps you relax even in the midst of a stress stricken environment. This is one of the foremost reasons why people want to start practicing Yoga – to feel more fit, to be more energetic, be happier and peaceful. The Yoga movements are performed, mostly, in a group setting on a special Yoga mat with an aid of a Yoga instructor. The body’s own weight is used for resistance and a great deal of focus is accorded to the flow from one posture into the other. There are many different Yoga styles and they differ in their emphasis. No one style is better than the other. The Style you use is a matter of personal preference or a matter of need.

    Vinyasa Yoga, for example, makes use of modified Yoga Poses that are designed to meet the specific needs of an individual and to enhance healing, flexibility and strength of joints. The poses also intend to promote the feeling of well-being and strength. Practices may also include meditation, reflection, study and other classic elements, but the emphasis of this branch of Yoga practice is on coordinating breath and movement. As you can imagine, given the scope of practice, the inherent therapeutic applications and the heritage of the lineage, the training requirements for teacher certification are extensive.

    Pilates seek to reach much the same goals, also via a series of controlled movements. The major difference is that the Pilates technique not only has a full complement of matwork, but it incorporates work on the Pilates machines. The emphasis of the exercises is to strengthen the abdominals, improve posture, stabilize and lengthen the spine, improve balance and overall strength. Pilates gives you a longer, leaner, dancer-like line.

    Unlike many other training programs, Pilates works the whole body, emphasizing control, precision and concentration in both the mind and the body. Movements are not performed rapidly or repeated excessively instead, the focus is on quality not quantity. The abdominal muscles, lower back and buttocks (“powerhouse”) serve as the center of all movement, allowing the rest of the body to move freely. This focus on core stabilization makes one stronger from the inside out and is critical for the advancement of the client. The low impact nature of Pilates makes it ideal for injury prevention and rehabilitation. Its six principles-concentration, control, centering, breathing, flow and precision-train the body to move efficiently with minimal impact on the body. The balance between strength and flexibility creates a healthy, vigorous and symmetrical workout for all muscle groups resulting in a leaner, more balanced, and stronger body.

    If after reading about both techniques you are still left with a question of which of these two fitness techniques is right for you then here is the answer: Do them both in conjunction! The nature of the techniques makes it easy for them to complement each other. Get the stretch from Yoga and keep it from Pilates. Strengthen your abdominals on the reformer and watch your poses improve. Join the breathing techniques of Pilates and meditative aspect of Yoga into your daily routine and see the stress of your everyday life, begin to dissipate. Both techniques are time-proven, established, and with the help of an experienced instructor, you will surely reach the goals you set up for yourself!

  • What is yoga?
    Yoga is the best and most time-tested path to physical and mental well-being known to mankind. While some people think of yoga simply as physical exercise, it is actually a complete system for overall health and well-being. It includes everything from physical postures, personal hygiene, and a healthy diet to premeditation, breathing, and relaxation techniques. The most advanced forms of meditation and self-realization are also a part of yoga. Wai Lana’s workouts focus on yoga’s physical techniques.
    Why do yoga?
    Like many forms of exercise, yoga asanas effectively stretch and strengthen your body. The greatest benefits of yoga asanas, however, come from their profound effects on the internal systems of the body. By bending, stretching, twisting, and flexing in the various postures, you bathe your internal organs with oxygenated blood and prana, also known as life force energy or chi. Yoga asanas soothe and tone your nerves and regulate the endocrine system, which is responsible for the production of hormones–one of the keys to both physical and mental health. They also improve digestion and elimination, strengthen the respiratory system, and tone the reproductive organs. Although yoga techniques like asanas, breathing, and relaxation are extremely effective in relieving stress, it is Yoga Sound meditation that relieves deep-seated stress and anxiety, enabling you to experience yoga’s greatest gifts: spiritual happiness and inner peace.

    Wai Lana
    It would be difficult, if not impossible, to find anyone who has had as much influence as Wai Lana in increasing the worldwide appreciation of the beauty and benefits of the ancient art of yoga. Wai Lana’s internationally aired TV series attracts a huge audience and has played a significant part in the skyrocketing popularity of yoga. Click here to read Wai Lana’s biography.

    What is Pilates?
    Derived from ancient yoga asanas, the Pilates exercise system was formulated by Joseph Pilates over 80 years ago for more specific and limited purposes. Although Pilates is not a complete balanced or holistic exercise and health system, it is quite useful. Pilates focuses mainly on cultivating core strength in the body and lengthening the spine. Practiced for decades by dancers, Pilates has become popular in recent years for its largely aesthetic body sculpting effect. Pilates can be a valuable tool for enhancing strength, definition, and good posture in partnership with Wai Lana Yoga. Click here to explore Wai Lana’s Pilates Yoga line of products

    Guidelines for yoga and Pilates practice:
    – Yoga postures, especially inversions and those that compress the abdomen, should not be done on a full stomach. Listen to your body–if you practice too soon after eating or drinking, certain poses will feel uncomfortable.

    – It’s best to practice yoga asanas barefoot, using a yoga mat or nonslip surface for standing poses. A mat, rug, or folded yoga blanket will provide firm padding for other asanas.

    – Wear comfortable clothing, something that allows you to move freely.

    – Ideally, the room should be well ventilated. Have enough space to extend your arms and legs in all directions without hitting anything.

    – While practicing, concentrate on the feeling that the asana is producing in your body.

    – If you feel too weak or shaky in a pose, come out of it. Gradually, you will build up your strength and be able to hold the pose longer.

    – Don’t go beyond your personal limitations, but extend your boundaries gently. Doing the asanas correctly means doing them to the best of your ability without straining.

    – Throughout the workout, focus on your breath, inhaling and exhaling fully and completely through your nose. Breathing with awareness not only feels good, but also balances and regulates energy flow within the body, strengthening your internal organs and boosting your resistance to disease.

  • O.M.G.! HOW CAN’T U KNOW

    yoga is like peaceful and relaxing every way,

    but pilaties is like exersise where u strech,hold on u srech both ways in pilaties and yoga, huh?

    oops

Leave a Comment