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How is the following poem ‘Romantic’?

Can you help me note the how ‘The Maniac’s Song’ reflects Romantic notions? Thanks!
Bring me a garland, bring me a wreath;
Bring me a flower from the dank stream side;
Bring me a herb smelling sweetly of death,
Wet with the drowsy tide.
Haste to the pool with the green-weed breast,
Where the dark wave crawls through the sedge;
Where the bittern of the wilderness builds her nest,
In the flags of its oozy edge;
Where no sun shines through the live-long day,
Because of the blue-wreathed mist,
Where the cockatrice creeps her foul egg to lay,
And the speckled snake has hissed:
And bring me the flag that is moist with the wave,
And the rush where the heath-winds sigh,
And the hemlock plant, that flourishes so brave,
And the poppy, with its coal-black eye;
And weave them tightly, and weave them well,
The fever of my head to allay;—
And soon shall I faint with the death-weed smell,
And sleep these throbbings away.
And my hot, hot heart, that is fluttering so fast,
Shall shudder with a strange, cold thrill;
And the damp hand of Death o’er my forehead shall be passed,
And my lips shall be stiff and still.
And crystals of ice on my bosom shall arise,
Prest out from the shivering pore;
And oft shall it struggle with pent-up sighs,
But soon it shall struggle no more.
For the poppy on my head shall her cool breath shed,
And wind through the blue, blue tide;
And the bony wand of Death shall draw my last breath,
All by the dark stream side.
By Romantic, I meant whether it belongs to the Romantic period of the late17th to mid 18th century!
Also, is the ‘maniacal’ poet physically ill (illness possibly induced by the fumes of narcotic flowers??) or insane?
This is rather confusing. :o(

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Matt S
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Matt S

The nature imagery, as well as the contemplations about death, coupled with it’s overall melancholic tone makes it typical of the Romantic genre.

Figment
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Figment

it seems to be about the struggles and hardships of love
also the writer seems to be mesmerized by the thought of death.

mayanas
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mayanas

It beautifies nature (and death) every other line.

Peter
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Peter

Necrophilia. Do you believe in life after loooove.(song reference) Do you believe in love after death?

micheleann62
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micheleann62

The poet finds a certain romance in his death. He is close to it, finds it inviting. From the descriptions he references I would say he has reached a level of acceptance that almost excites him.