More

    Do you think meditation is a spiritual practice?

    Viewing 6 reply threads
    • Author
      Posts
      • #42613
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        I realize that meditation means different things to different people. In your own opinion or experience, is meditation a spiritual practice? Do you practice meditation?

      • #261423
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        Definitely. The rosary is my favorite form of meditation. It is very spiritual, as explained here:
        http:;//www.medjugorje.org/rosary.htm

      • #261422
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        No. “spiritual” is just a dumb buzz word that people use to describe petty fads.
        Meditation is a real practice that helps your focus and calmness and it’s used for reflection and wisdom.

      • #261421
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        Yes. Yes.
        Yesterday I misunderstood what was posted and thought the word used was mediation, as using a psychic. Beware folks. Be aware.

      • #261420
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        In Buddhism, there are two types of meditation; one is Samatha (Metta) Meditation and the other is Vipassanā (Mindfulness) Meditation. Meditation mainly has two purposes. The first step is to develop mental concentration. The second is to gain ‘insight’ into the nature of things through ‘mindfulness, awareness, vigilance and observation.’ Meditation is intended ‘to purify the mind’. It cleanses the thought process of what can be called psychic irritants, things like impatience, stress, anxiety, fear, anger, hatred, depression, resentment, etc. – things that keep us snarled up in emotional bondage, and produces traits like lovingkindness, patience, compassion, sympathetic joy, equanimity and wisdom. ‘It brings the mind to a state of tranquility and awareness, to a state of concentration and insight’. Lovingkindness (Metta), Compassion (Karuna), Sympathetic Joy (Mudita) and Equanimity (Upekkha) are the Four Sublime States of mind. ‘You practice Loving-kindness Meditation for the purification of your own mind, just as you practice Mindfulness Meditation for your own attainment of peace and liberation from pain and suffering’. As you practice loving-kindness within yourself, you can behave in a most friendly manner without biases, prejudices, discrimination or hate. Your noble behavior helps you to help others in a most practical manner to reduce their pain and suffering. It is compassionate people who can help others. Compassion as a manifestation of loving-kindness in action, for one who does not have loving-kindness cannot help others. Noble behavior means behaving in a most friendly and most cordial manner. ‘Behavior includes your thought speech and action’. If this triple mode of expression of your behavior is contradictory behavior cannot be noble behavior. On the other hand, pragmatically speaking, it is much better to cultivate the noble thought, “May all beings be happy minded” than the thought, “I hate him”. Our noble thought will one day express itself in noble behavior and our spiteful thought in evil behavior.
        Practicing ‘basic’ Mindfulness Meditation: ‘Find a quiet and comfortable place. Sit in a chair or on a cushion on the floor with your head, neck and back straight but not stiff. Put aside all thoughts of the past and the future and stay in the present moment. Become aware of your breathing, focusing on the sensation of air moving in and out of your body as you breathe. Feel your belly rise and fall, the air enter your nostrils and leave your mouth. Pay attention to the way each breath changes and is different. ‘Observation-without attachment-is an important key to mindfulness meditation’. In mindfulness meditation one is ‘an observer’ of thoughts and emotions that arise in the mind during meditation. These thoughts are not to be analyzed nor harshly judged-but are to be recognized as they simply are: thoughts and feelings. They are not to be clinged (attached) to, for clinging (attachment) causes suffering. We use the breath as an anchor. What does this mean? When a thought/feeling arises in the mind, we observe it-making a mental note of it, then gently return to the breath. If you’re observing your thoughts and emotions without getting caught up in them, then your on the right track. Remember not to be hard on yourself when thoughts pop-up and when your thoughts wander; be patient and gentle with the mind, and simply return to the breath.
        May all beings be happy and free from suffering.

      • #261419
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        It is a very Christian thing to do, every time you think about GOD and reflect on HE’S WORD and how good HE has been to you, you are in effect meditating on HE’S WORD. Yes l do it often.

      • #261418
        Forum
        Keymaster
        Helpful
        Up
        0
        Down
        Not Helpful

        Meditation is a great way to maintain one’s spiritual health. It helps you to relax your mind and body so that it would be easier for you to keep your soul healthy.

    Viewing 6 reply threads
    • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.
    Skip to toolbar