4 Comments

  • As someone who is engaged in this discipline full time, I do two or three interviews a month for magazines, newspapers, radio and TV shows, and increasingly, for feature films and documentaries included on feature film DVDs. I’ve done this for years, as have my colleagues. So we do our best, but given the amount of media the average person is exposed to on a daily basis, it’s not all that easy to be heard or seen.

  • Psi…If it weren’t for your links…probably none of us would know about ANY of their research! So..THANKS for the links!

  • Yes, I believe that there is a substantial amount of research, definitions, and other work available for those who are interested in finding it. There is a substantial web presence, and I’ve listed just a few that I found quickly in the sources below.

    Many researchers have presented their work in journals and at conferences so that it is exposed to the public and to those who are interested in reviewing their methods. In addition, I believe that, ironically, the work of many skeptical organizations also provide exposure for the work going on in the field, and although much of the skeptical data is biased and unscientific in it’s criticisms, any publicity exposes more people to the work that is being done.

    I don’t believe that it would be wise for any scientific organization to create a marketing campaign, provide a million dollar cash prize, or promote a media blitz to expose its work. That would only diminish the credibility of the organization and give more ammunition to those who consider these fields to be dominated by money grubbing fakers.

Leave a Comment