HomeDiscussion ForumChristians-What do you think of the Tao Te Ching?

Christians-What do you think of the Tao Te Ching?

I have always wondered how a Christian would view this book.
I read it only after I left the Baptist Church, do I don’t know how I would have reacted had I read it while I was still religious.
Don’t judge it based on Taoism (a misconstrued ideology based on the Tao Te Ching), but soley on the book itself.
Please only answer if you’ve actually read it.
For me-it makes far more sense to me than the Bible ever did. No Heaven or Hell-just a way to live in harmony with this world. Granted, I struggle to follow it, as Christians do with the Bible. But I’ve never been more at peace and happy since I undertook my way of life.
What do you think of the book?
Frog E-To each their own.
However, I think it is still a good idea to study other ideals.
What harm can come of understanding others?
Clusium-The I Ching or the Book of Changes is also a classic.
It took me a while to figure out how to use it though lol.
I just bought a good version of it that explains the text via multiple commentators.
As for Confucionism-I recognize the wisdom of Kong Fu Tzu (Confucious to the Western World), but I was not comfortable with it’s focus on the ordering of society as opposed to the harmony with the world as expounded by the Tao Te Ching.
As for other thinkers of the time such as Sun Tzu who wrote the Art of War (still debated) show a strong Taoist influence in thier works.
Others, such as Han Fei Tzu take a much more radical (and arguably more effective approach) and focus instead simply on survival of the state called Legalism.
Solarius-Well put.
In fact, if you take what Jesus preached-and What the Tao Te Ching teaches-the two are remarkably simmilar.

10 COMMENTS

  1. I have read parts of translated versions. They are sayings.
    The Tao Te Ching or Dao De Jing (traditional Chinese: 道德經; simplified Chinese: 道德经; pinyin: Dà odéjÄ«ng), originally known as Laozi or Lao tzu (Chinese: 老子; pinyin: LÇŽozǐ), is a Chinese classic text. Its name comes from the opening words of its two sections: 道 dà o “way,” Chapter 1, and å¾· dé “virtue,” Chapter 38, plus 經 jÄ«ng “classic.” According to tradition, it was written around the 6th century BC by the Taoist sage Laozi (or Lao Tzu, “Old Master”), a record-keeper at the Zhou Dynasty court, by whose name the text is known in China. The text’s true authorship and date of composition or
    compilation are still debated.
    The Tao Te Ching is fundamental to the Taoist school (Dà ojiā 道家) of Chinese philosophy and strongly influenced other schools, such as Legalism and Neo-Confucianism. This ancient book is also central in Chinese religion, not only for Taoism (Dà ojiāo 道教) but Chinese Buddhism, which when first introduced into China was largely interpreted through the use of Taoist words and concepts. Many Chinese artists, including poets, painters, calligraphers, and even gardeners have used the Tao Te Ching as a source of inspiration. Its influence has also spread widely outside East Asia, aided by hundreds of translations into Western languages.
    The Wade-Giles romanization Tao Te Ching dates back to early English transliterations in the late 19th century, and many people continue using it, especially for words and phrases that have become well-established in English. The pinyin romanization Daodejing originated in the late 20th century, and this romanization is becoming increasingly popular, having been adopted as the official system by the Chinese government. See discussion at Daoism-Taoism romanization issue.

  2. I think that there is much wisdom in it. One can be a Christian and gain insight from a wide variety of different spiritual or cultural influences. Some Christians are terrified of all things non-Christian, but I’m not among them.

    • Biblical truth never teaches that we are to put our heads in the sand and run from truth. The Tao does teach that to seek wisdom or knowledge is to go against the Tao. Christians are taught to study all things in order to ‘give an answer’ as to the truth. If you were to agree that when we were babies, we lacked certain mental and physical maturities; the same applies to ‘baby’ Christians in their ability to ‘explain’ the truth and their tendencies to be fearful of truths taught outside their faith.
      Although Taoism does speak of the greatness of forgiveness, it really doesn’t have any genuine means of providing it. The Tao is generally understood to be impersonal–not personal–and hence, incapable of extending forgiveness (which, after all, only a personal being can do). Furthermore, Taoism has no atonement for sin. Only Christianity offers a personal God, who loves us, and who sent His Son to be an atonement for our sins. This is often overlooked. But it is the only hope for man–and the only real “good news” there is (at least in an ultimate sense).
      When faced with the Word (or Truth) man goes through three phases of understanding. Reflection, Suppression, then Substitution; because most of us can’t accept the Truth.

  3. I have found the one true God….no need to search anymore. I have no struggle with reading the bible. The Holy Spirit helps me with understanding of God’s word..as he does with all Born Again Christians.

  4. I’ve never read it, but, I know that it is the Taoist scripture, based on the I Ching.
    From what I understand, both Taoists & Confucianists use the I Ching as well.

  5. I am a Catholic. I have read it and there is quite a bit of wisdom and truth in that book
    The Catholic Church recognizes that there is truth and beauty in all religions that have it’s origin from the God of Abraham.

  6. Isn’t that the one where the guy was born through an arm pit?
    just kidding actually I’ve the I respect the Tao Te Ching, one of the few books written openly as opinion. I am on my own search to understand the Tao (way) of the world through study and observation. Only those who would seek to control the way would fear such a book.

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