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DKSHumble Oneʎəʌəəʍ ʎəʌəəd ʎəʌəəlsP'angprotoplasmicreversion Recent comment authors
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DKS
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DKS

With practice you will be able to meditate when walking, lying down, cycling, hiking, washing dishes and even while sitting in a plain old chair, at your desk or on the step of your house or near your favorite tree. You do not have to meditate in any specific ‘seating’ posture. It’s not necessary to emulate another cultures habits or norms to practice meditation or the Dhamma. Your first focus should be what the Buddha actually taught about meditation, all other ‘opinions’ are exactly that. The Buddha taught us to be mindful of breath. (Anapanasati) “The meditator should then breathe… Read more »

Humble One
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Humble One

I think which method that should be choosed by you is the one that most suitable for you. In Anguttara Nikaya 4.170, Ven. Ananda said: “Friends, whoever – monk or nun – declares the attainment of arahantship in my presence, they all do it by means of one or another of four paths. Which four? 1. developed insight preceded by tranquillity. As he develops insight preceded by tranquillity, the path is born. He follows that path, develops it, pursues it. As he follows the path, developing it & pursuing it – his fetters are abandoned, his obsessions destroyed. 2. developed… Read more »

ʎəʌəəʍ ʎəʌəəd ʎəʌəəls
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ʎəʌəəʍ ʎəʌəəd ʎəʌəəls

I find the meditation course here http://www.onlinemeditation.ca/ pretty good. Simple and straightforward (and free).

P'ang
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P'ang

Others have given you excellent advice on different meditation techniques. But even with the best of advice, most people – newcomers and old-timers, alike – can sometimes struggle with meditation. When challenges arise (and they always do), the direct guidance of a teacher and the support of a community can help you. Few people can sustain Buddhist meditation practice for very long without such guidance. That’s really the only reason that Buddhist meditation centers exist – to help people begin and sustain meditation practice. So if you’re not currently practicing with a teacher, you might consider doing so. Here’s a… Read more »

protoplasmicreversion
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protoplasmicreversion

There are many different objects of meditation throughout our training, so it is either a matter of choosing a particular subject or being advised by our teacher regarding what to focus on. A good place to start is the breath. In order to effectively absorb into objects of meditation though, it is important that our body doesn’t distract us through pains or movement. Therefore, to start, sit in any comfortable position that will not become painful very quickly. In a chair, on the floor, a bed, couch, or meditation cushion; doesn’t matter too much. There are specific postures that have… Read more »

Upasakha Jason
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Upasakha Jason

Yes, you will find lots of confusing and often contradictory instructions. This is because many instructors are presenting instructions and advice from their own experience. Ajahn Brahm focuses on jhanas through breath meditation. Thannisaro Bhikkhu says experiment with the breath and see what works. Ajahn Chah says start with the three points of nose, chest, and abdomen till the body and mind settle down, then confine your mind to the nose. Bhante Gunaratana follows more or less what the Visuddhimagga says: concentrate on the breath where it goes in and out of the nose, but to practice Vipassana meditation, you… Read more »

Nitrin
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Nitrin

Meditation can be very difficult at first, then it becomes easy. There are many different types of meditation, particularly in Buddhism, so you will need to look into the different schools of thought within Buddhism, find that which appeals to you most, and pursue the practices they recommend. Do you prefer Theravadin Buddhism? Zen? Tibetan? (And if you really get into it, within each of those you will find various traditions.) Or find a teacher or writer that you resonate with, and see what they recommend. If you particularly like a teacher, you may want to check out what tradition… Read more »

Anne
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Anne

Hare Krishna I sincerely hope you find peace in Buddhist meditation. I just felt that I might add that Hinduism (Vaishnavism to be precise) says that focusing on nothing is really difficult. Krishna says in Bhagavad Gita also that “From wherever the mind wanders due to its flickering and unsteady nature, one must certainly withdraw it and bring it back under the control of the self. Gradually, step by step, one should become situated in trance by means of intelligence sustained by full conviction, and thus the mind should be fixed on the self alone and should think of nothing… Read more »

David
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David

As you probabley know there are various schools of Buddhism. I belong to Soka Gakkai international and we do have a basic way of practicing. If you would like to see/experience what we do for yourself.
Look under our web site to find a member near you and attend a Buddhist introduction meeting in your area. No obligation. You won’t be sorry. We are about 12 million members world wide in about 190 countries/territories , all practing the same way.

Hahahahaha... ^_^
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Hahahahaha... ^_^

There are two main kinds of meditation, Samatha and Vipassana. They are likened to ‘stopping and listening’. Samatha is usually done in the form of simple breath meditation. SImply sit down in any posture you like (be it cross-legged, Lotus position, kneeling, lying down, etc) and simply focus on your breath. This is where the part about watching your thoughts, labeling them, and letting them go comes in – you will likely not be able to focus for very long. You will find yourself chasing those thoughts which come to mind instead of letting them go, but that is what… Read more »