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‘Buddhism’ – am new to buddhist practice of meditation: During Meditation, what does one do with thoughts of..?

Dukkha, Annica and Anatta that arise in the Mind ?

Also, when one is ‘not’ meditating, and Dukkha, Annica, and Anatta arise in the Mind – what does one do with such thoughts ?

Any reference websites which would explain this well – would also be quite helpful and greatly appreciated.

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Marylyn SpletzermickaelTommy Hbodhidavevalhall13 Recent comment authors
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Marylyn Spletzer
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I have been to your website before. The more I read, the more I keep coming back! 😉

mickael
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mickael

watching thoughts and not dwelling on them is a skill which can not be taught. the only known way to learn it is practice. the more you exercise, the easier it goes.

there are no mysteries on the way. things are as simple as they can be. 🙂

good luck.
mickael

Tommy H
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Tommy H

According to the Zhuan Falun Lecture on the web: “I’ll tell you a truth: the whole process of cultivation is a process of constantly getting rid of human attachments.” As a Buddhist, when thoughts come up affecting meditation, they are usually attachments that one has not given up. The more attachments one gives up, the deeper peace and calmer one becomes. It may take a period of time to identify the root cause of the attachment. To get a calm mind, review the third section in the Ninth Talk in the same Lecture. The mediation mechanism is well explained in… Read more »

bodhidave
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bodhidave

There are different meditation techniques, but by and large you’d treat all thoughts sort of the same during must forms of meditation. Namely, to notice that a thought has occurred and then matter-of-factly to return to your object of meditation (say, the breath). . Doing that, though, some insight can arise relating to the qualities of thoughts, namely that they are not adequate to provide an ultimate satisfaction (= dukkha), they don’t last (= annica), and they aren’t in any substantive way a “self” (= anatta). . You can do sort of directed reflections on those qualities in specific regards… Read more »

valhall13
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valhall13

Very easy.
remember thoughts are void. They have no substance.
When you meditate and thoughts arise simply acknowledge them and let them go.
During post meditation, remain mindful, see dukka thoughts arise and let them go as well.
It is only when one grasps at the thought and starts building on it when problems arise.
If you wish to learn more about how this is done I invite you to contact my kind lama at:
http://www.lamajigme.com
om mani padme hum

papamoto22
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papamoto22

The clearest information I have found on clearing my mind has been what I have read in either of the books written by Eckhart Tolle, ‘The Power of Now’ or ‘A New Earth.’

You can also see him speak on Oprah’s website.