Discussion Forum kund-talks

I’m having problems with meditation?

It seems like everytime I try to meditate I either fall asleep or start thinking about something else. I used to be really good at it but now I just can’t freaking concentrate.

I really want to start again because I used to feel so peaceful and these days I just get angry so fast and I can’t release it.

If it helps the person answering I’m a Christian Mystic, so we still believe in the kundalini, chakras, life force, ect. Basically it’s like hindu’s or Buddhist for God & Jesus if that makes any sense. Lol.
Thanks Maaars.. but I have been born again.. lol, and I have a Christian Bible, but keep in mind that’s not the only book 😉

9 Comments

  • Good morning Blair.

    I trust you have the basics “down pat” and assume you are in a seated and not lying position so I won’t go over them. It doesn’t matter whether one is a Christian Mystic or whatever in practicing meditation. While I will answer from a Buddhist perspective the concepts apply to you regardless. In addition to some of the great suggestions you received, here are a few quotations that I have found helpful in my practice. I hope they will prove to be the same in your meditation practice. Sogyal Rinpoche in “The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying” advises: “As you continue to practice meditation, you may have all kinds of experiences, both good and bad. You might experience states of bliss, clarity, or absence of thoughts. In one way these are very good experiences, and signs of progress in meditation. For when you experience bliss, it’s a sign that desire has temporarily dissolved. When you experience real clarity, it’s a sign that aggression has temporarily ceased. When you experience a state of absence of thought, it’s a sign that your ignorance has temporarily died. By themselves they are good experiences, but if you get attached to them, they become obstacles. Experiences are not realization in themselves; but if we remain free of attachment to them, they become what they really are—that is, materials for realization.”

    If your mind begins to wander do not feel as though you’ve failed. It’s natural for this to occur. Just calmly move the thought to the side and continue with your meditation.
    If you find yourself getting sleepy, just readjust your position a little and keep you eyes open. Rinpoche further wrote: “Dudjom Rinpoche used to say that a beginner should practice meditation in short sessions. Practice for four or five minutes, then take a short break of just one minute. During the break, let go of the method, but do not let go of your mindfulness altogether. Sometimes when you have been struggling to practice, curiously, the very moment when you take a break from the method—if you are still mindful and present—is the moment when meditation actually happens. That is why the break is just as important a part of meditation as the sitting itself. Sometimes I tell my students who are having problems with their practice to practice during the break and take a break during their meditation! Sometimes people think that when they meditate there should be no thoughts and emotions at all; and when thoughts and emotions do arise, they become annoyed and exasperated with themselves and think they have failed. Nothing could be further from the truth. There is a Tibetan saying: ‘It’s a tall order to ask for meat without bones, and tea without leaves.’ As long as you have a mind, you will have thoughts and emotions.”

    I certainly hope this is of some assistance. It certainly has helped me.

    May all be at peace.

    John

    EDIT: I just came across the following quotation which may give you additional assistance in answering your question so I thought I’d share it with you.

    “..when you start practicing, you should not expect too much. We live in a time of computers and automation, so you may feel that inner development is also an automatic thing for which you press a button and everything changes. It is not so. Inner development is not easy and will take time. External progress, the latest space missions and so forth, have not reached their present level within a short period but over centuries, each generation making greater developments based on those of the previous generation. However, inner development is even more difficult since internal improvement cannot be transferred from generation to generation. Your past life’s experience very much influences this life, and this life’s experience becomes the basis for the next rebirth’s development, but transference of inner development from one person to another is impossible. Thus, everything depends on yourself, and it will take time. I have met Westerners who at the beginning were very enthusiastic about their practice, but after a few years have completely forgotten it, and there are no traces of what they had practiced at one time. This is because at the beginning they expected too much. Shantideva’s ‘Engaging in the Bodhisattva Deeds’ emphasizes the importance of the practice of patience—tolerance. This tolerance is an attitude not only towards your enemy but also an attitude of sacrifice, of determination, so that you do not fall into the laziness of discouragement. You should practice patience, or tolerance, with great resolve. This is important.” ~from “Kindness, Clarity, and Insight 25th Anniversary Edition” by The Fourteenth Dalai Lama (Snow Lion Publications)

  • Dear Mr. Blair,

    You can meditate only when you ar ein soul conscious. Control on breathing etc may help you calm down. But hen you reach soul conscious you can meditate longer. Further you can meditate by keeping eyes open. Keep your back straight while you meditate.You can contact brahmakumaris centre nearest to you for bettter guidence.

  • Meditation does not have to be about the just sitting there and breathing in and out blank mind thing. I too struggle with that – and fall asleep. Sometimes I can do it, sometimes I can’t. Find something that is meditative for you. I find that I am the most relaxed, and quiet in mind, when gardening. There are is lots of information about alternative meditations, eg, dance, walking.

    If you find it frustrating, and it makes you angry, then it is not meditation!

  • First stop concentrating so hard and just flow. The sounds and mental distractions are all natural and should just be acknowledged, blessed and allowed to slip away from consideration without anger. Remember that meditation is not a contest to win or lose but a simple way to reboot and realign your balance when frazzled and a place to be peaceful in the insanity of life. To just be without having to be something is the trick, just be.

  • Hi, glad to know you. Well, I have a few good suggestions. You need to be born again first and then meditate on the Word of God, the Christian Bible. A good place to start is in the Gospels and meditate mostly on what Jesus said, such as “Man does not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds out of the mouth of God.” Matt. 4:4 or

    “What gives life is God’s Spirit; man’s power is of no use at all. The words I have spoken to you are Spirit and life.” John 6:63

  • well it sounds interesting. but i think stress & sickness blocks skills in meditating. but humans can overcome that thru thoughts.

    even the most fragile person can do some thoughts. i’m just saying this because i believe thoughts are the 1st step to meditation. visualizing is also gr8.

    keep up the good tries! tell me how it goes.

  • Usually what helps me is to focus on my breathing. Try to exhale for about 3-5 seconds longer that you inhale. hope it helps! =)

  • do you know when you are about to fall asleep?
    if you do, you can always get up and put some water on your face, then try again.

    that’s what i usually do, but i fall asleep by mistake sometimes.

    as for thinking of something else, work your way up. start with a single train of thought, and hold on to it as long as you possibly can.

    just work your way up with time periods as well.
    start with 5 minutes. then 10. -so on-

    takes practice ya know.

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